Calls for child heart unit closure

first_imgAn NHS review announced last Friday that paediatric heart surgery should no longer take place at Oxford’s John Radcliffe hospital.The review aims to reduce the number of specialist centres in Britain. Out of the eleven centres inspected, the John Radcliffe received the lowest ranking assessment by a “significant margin”.Parents of children who have undergone surgery at the unit have expressed their outrage at the NHS decision and have launched a campaign to save the service.Heart operations were suspended at the hospital earlier this year following the deaths of four infants at the surgery unit. The surgeon Caner Salih has since been found by an independent investigation to have made no errors in judgement.last_img

Ocean City Police Activity Report: April 12 to 18

first_imgApril 18, 2015: Saturday Calls for service: 102Motor Vehicle Stops: 47Motor Vehicle Accidents: 0Property Checks: 24Alarms: 2The Police Department assisted with 2 fire and 8 EMS callsDWI, Route 52, one in custody, at 7:58amAssault, 600 block Wesley Ave., at 5:22pmDomestic violence, 3200 block Haven Ave., at 7:28pm PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS:Just a reminder that it is a violation of a City Ordinance to have dogs on the boardwalk anytime during the year.City Ordinance 87-17sec.4-32 prohibits any Boat/Trailer over 22 feet in overall length from being parked on a city street. Any boat/trailer less than 22 feet in overall length can only remain on a city street for three consecutive days. Officers will be issuing summons and towing boats/trailers for any observed violations. Ocean City Police Department April 17, 2015: FridayCalls for service: 72Motor Vehicle Stops: 23Motor Vehicle Accidents: 2Property Checks: 26Alarms: 2The Police Department assisted with 2 fire and 1 EMS callsMotor vehicle accident, 1700 block Simpson Ave., at 9:34amWarrant, Route 52, one in custody, at 12:48pmMotor vehicle accident, 600 block Asbury Ave., at 2:10pmWarrant, 3800 block West Ave., one in custody, at 8:35pm April 14, 2015: TuesdayCalls for service: 63Motor Vehicle Stops: 17Motor Vehicle Accidents: 0Property Checks: 23Alarms: 0The Police Department assisted with 2 fire and 2 EMS callsTrespassing, 700 block 11th St., at 12:01amWarrant, 900 block Haven Ave., one in custody, at 2:45pmHarassment, 800 block 8th St., at 6:23pmVerbal, 1100 block Asbury Ave., at 6:45pmCDS, 1400 block West Ave., one in custody, at 11:09pm April 12, 2015: Sunday                                                Calls for service: 38Motor Vehicle Stops: 9Motor Vehicle Accidents: 0Property Checks: 11Alarms: 1The Police Department assisted with 5 Fire and 4 EMS callsDomestic violence, 2100 block Haven Ave., at 9:08amTheft, 1100 block Bay Ave., at 12:55pmTheft, 800 block 8th St., at 1:28pmCDS, 800 block Central Ave., one in custody, at 2:23pm April 13, 2015: Monday Calls for service: 94Motor Vehicle Stops: 29Motor Vehicle Accidents: 0Property Checks: 31Alarms: 2The Police Department assisted with 2 Fire and 2 EMS callsWarrant, unit block Bay Ave, one in custody, at 10:54amWarrant, 34th Street, one in custody, at 7:44pmCDS, 900 block Simpson Ave., one in custody, at 11:36pm April 16, 2015: ThursdayCalls for service: 69Motor Vehicle Stops: 27Motor Vehicle Accidents: 0Property Checks: 12Alarms: 2The Police Department assisted with 4 fire and 3 EMS callsTheft, 400 block Haven Ave., at 7:00pm OCEAN CITY POLICE SUMMARIZED WEEK’S ACTIVITIESApril 12 – 18, 2015Calls for Service: 503Daily Average: 72 April 15, 2015: WednesdayCalls for service: 65Motor Vehicle Stops: 22Motor Vehicle Accidents: 1Property Checks: 18Alarms: 3The Police Department assisted with 2 fire and 2 EMS callsShoplifting, 1200 block West Ave., one in custody, at 8:51amMotor vehicle accident, 900 block Asbury Ave., at 3:20pmlast_img read more

MEPs set to vote on weights legislation

first_imgThe issue of prescribed weight legislation – including bread weights – was due to be voted on in the European Parliament as British Baker went to press.Trade bodies, including the Federation of Bakers (FoB), are battling against the draft EU Nominal Quantities Directive, which suggests deregulating weight legislation, including the current UK system of selling bread above 300g in set weights of 400g, 800g and 1,200g. They argue that deregulation will cause confusion among consumers, because no specific measurements will be required by law. For example, one retai-ler could sell a 400g loaf, another a 380g, for the same price.FoB director Gordon Polson told British Baker he was “reasonably confident” the European Parliament would vote in favour of allowing the various European nations to keep their own weights legislation. In December, the EU Internal Market and Consumer Protection Committee voted to exclude bread and other staples from the legislation. The issue is due to be voted on by MEPs on February 2.last_img read more

Bob Weir Joins The “Alone & Together” Band At Sweetwater [Watch]

first_imgLast night, very special guest Bob Weir joined the”Alone & Together” band, including Kevin Morby (Woods), Sam Cohen, Eric D. Johnson (of Fruit Bats), Josh Kaufman, and Joe Russo (of Joe Russo’s Almost Dead) for the first of three shows at Sweetwater Music Hall in Mill Valley, California. While he was only added to the bill hours before showtime, the Grateful Dead guitarist still showed as a surprise guest at the Thursday night show.Weir sat in for a performance of his own “Only A River” and“Lay My Lily Down” from his 2016 acoustic solo album Blue Mountain, in addition to some Grateful Dead classics like “Peggy-O,” “Bird Song,” and “Stella Blue.” You can watch some videos below, posted by Ratdog Tour:Peggy-OLay My Lily Down, Bird Song, Stella BlueThis was only the third time that the band members have played as “Alone & Together,” which they describe to mean “a series wherein some of your favorite singer/songwriters/musicians get together and cover one another, in addition to playing their own songs, choice covers, and surprise jams.”The band will return to the stage tomorrow night in Los Angeles and Sunday in San Francisco.[H/T JamBase]last_img read more

If You Love The Beatles, You Should Read The Two Volume Biography Of Producer Sir George Martin

first_imgThere’s no question that The Beatles introduced new styles of writing, performing, and especially recording music in the early 1960s. Much of their success comes from the hands of George Martin, the record producer who crafted the inimitable sound of The Beatles. Otherwise known as the “fifth Beatle,” Sir George Martin was the first producer who helped shape the Beatles’ incredible body of work over the course of seven years. Last year, author Kenneth Womack released Maximum Volume: The Life of Beatles Producer George Martin, the first-ever biography about Sir George Martin, tracing his early life and career. The second book of two is ready to hit shelves on September 4, 2018, called Sound Pictures: The Life of Beatles Producer George Martin, The Later Years 1966-2016.In 1966, the Beatles and George Martin stood at a creative crossroads. The bandmates had started to feel stunted in their musical growth, so they started engaging in brash experimentation both inside and outside the studio. The Beatles had also expanded their demographic considerably beyond teens and young adults, leading to new fans of all ages. With more recognition, the band began to feel like prisoners of their fame and grew frustrated by the culture’s inability to grasp the meaning behind their work. Martin worked with the band as they navigated the changing landscape of mid-1960s rock ’n’ roll. Martin’s work ethic and studio savviness earned him a long-lasting partnership with the Beatles that continued throughout the later years of his life. In Sound Pictures, readers will discover how Martin helped the bandmates grow as musicians and found the transformative sound that the Beatles are known for today.Sound Pictures: The Life of Beatles Producer George Martin, The Later Years 1966-2016 is the second volume of the first full-length biography of George Martin. Kenneth Womack, author and Beatles scholar, provides a detailed account of Martin’s collaborative work with “the fab four” as they advance beyond the success of their earlier recordings. Sound Pictures takes readers behind the scenes and reveals George’s diligent efforts to consolidate the Beatles’ fame in the face of the sociocultural pressures of the time, most noteworthy being the “Beatles are more popular than Jesus” scandal. It also includes stories of Martin’s interactions with the band, including when John Lennon, who hated the sound of his own voice, requested that Martin tweak his vocals: “Make me sound like the Dalai Lama chanting from a mountaintop.”While Martin’s encouragement of musical experimentation led to the creation of such classics as Revolver, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (the highlight of his production career) and Abbey Road, mounting pressures and challenges threatened their achievements. After his work with the Beatles, Martin continued his work as a freelance music producer while discovering new prospects with musical acts such as Elton John, America, Jeff Beck, Cheap Trick and Paul McCartney. However, Martin and the Beatles would ultimately find their way back to each other to immortalize the magic that started it all.Sound Pictures is an exceptionally detailed look at the man who had incredible influence on the Beatles’ body of work. Decades later, George Martin’s legacy continues to influence music history as new generations rediscover the timeless wonder of the Beatles. Fans will enjoy following the story of the band’s incredible artistic trajectory after reaching the creative heights of Rubber Soul.For more information on both of Kenneth Womack’s work, head here.last_img read more

The goal: New arms

first_imgWill Lautzenheiser is an organ donor, willing to contribute almost everything. He said so on camera today.“Obviously, I’ve missed the opportunity to donate my own arms and legs, but everything else can be considered a hand-me-down, including my face if need be,” Lautzenheiser said.The pronouncement got a chuckle out of an assemblage of normally hard-boiled newspaper and television reporters, gathered to document Lautzenheiser’s decision to pursue a double arm transplant that may give him greater independence, and which represents the latest foray by the Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) into the frontiers of organ and tissue transplantation.Lautzenheiser, 39, is a quad amputee who until several years ago was a Boston University film professor. His trouble started in 2011, as he was beginning a new job in Montana. He developed a streptococcus infection that became necrotizing fasciitis, which destroyed the tissues of his arms and legs and nearly killed him. Doctors had to amputate the limbs to save his life.Lautzenheiser hopes to become BWH’s third double arm-transplant patient, its first involving an arm above the elbow, and one of just a few in the world to undergo the bilateral procedure. Simon Talbot, assistant professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and the lead surgeon on Lautzenheiser’s case, said that precise numbers are difficult to find, but there have been roughly 70 cases of arm transplants so far around the world, very few of which were double transplants.Lautzenheiser said his lack of independence was a factor in his decision to go forward with the procedure. With no legs, one arm amputated above the elbow, and one below the elbow, he is dependent on others for virtually everything. Even just gaining another elbow, he said, would help him greatly.If the procedure works as hoped, physicians expect that his right arm, which has its own elbow joint and some forearm muscles intact, will regain a great deal of functionality. The transplanted left arm has more question marks, Talbot said, but some functionality and even a sense of touch are possible.Lautzenheiser said he looks forward to holding his niece, hopes to resume his film work, and wants to cook again, something he misses greatly.He cleared BWH’s Institutional Review Board, which screens potential transplant candidates for a host of physical and psychological factors to ensure that they’re suitable for the procedure, according to Bohdan Pomahac, director of plastic surgery transplantation at BWH and associate professor of surgery at HMS.Pomahac, who led the team that performed the first U.S. face transplant in 2011, appeared at the news conference at BWH with Lautzenheiser, Talbot, and Richard Luskin, president and chief executive officer of the New England Organ Bank. After a century of development, transplantation has been dramatically accelerating in recent years, Pomahac said. Faces, upper extremities, and, more recently, lower extremities are being transplanted, promising restored functionality that was impossible a few years ago.The body’s immune response remains a problem, he said, and recipients must take immune-suppression drugs for the rest of their lives to keep their bodies from rejecting a graft as foreign. In addition to pioneering surgical transplant techniques, BWH is conducting research on ways to help the body accept its transplanted parts, he said, with clinical trials underway examining how to minimize the use of immune-suppression drugs and induce tolerance of the graft by the body.“We feel we are very close, and the future will tell,” Pomahac said. “What we are hoping to provide … is independence, something no prosthesis can provide.”BWH’s program has enjoyed a great deal of support from the hospital administration, Pomahac said, as well as funding from the Defense Department, which is interested in new ways to heal soldiers returning with battlefield injuries. A key partner in the effort is the New England Organ Bank, which will now begin looking for suitable donors for Lautzenheiser.Pomahac, Lautzenheiser, and Luskin expressed gratitude to families who, despite their grief at losing a loved one, decide to donate a body that can be used to save or improve other lives. Donor arms for Lautzenheiser will be matched to him in a number of ways, including blood type, skin tone, size, and gender.There remains a huge need for organ donation nationally, Luskin said. About 18 people die each day awaiting a donor organ, with 4,000 people waiting for organs in New England alone.“Unfortunately, there are just not enough donors,” Luskin said.Once a donor is found, Lautzenheiser faces 12 to 16 hours of surgery by a team led by Talbot. The surgeons will work on each arm of the donor and recipient, first severing and then reattaching bones, muscles, tendons and nerves. After surgery, Lautzenheiser will be in the hospital for weeks, after which he will face months of recovery. Talbot said it is difficult to know how much functionality Lautzenheiser will regain, and progress will likely be slow.Lautzenheiser, who thanked the doctors who treated him in Montana and Utah, said he initially didn’t think limb transplantation was an option. It was only after he had returned to Boston that a physician at Boston Medical Center suggested it and connected him with the BWH program.Lautzenheiser said the people around him kept him thinking positively and looking to the future, rather than fixating on his loss. He worked on a short film of his story, called “Stumped,” which is playing at film festivals, and has done comedy routines poking fun at his situation.With the bilateral arm transplant, Lautzenheiser will still be without legs, though he said new hands would help him manage his leg prostheses. He would consider a leg transplant, he said, though the surgeons said a four-limb procedure is not yet safe.Lautzenheiser admitted he feels some nervousness about the upcoming procedure and the uncertainty ahead. Though a quad amputee, he’s healthy now, he said. He’s looking forward to not just regaining function, but also helping to answer questions such as the long-term effects of anti-rejection drugs, which could aid future patients.“These are important questions, and I’m as curious as anyone,” Lautzenheiser said. “Let’s find out.”last_img read more

Students discover ‘footprint’

first_imgIt takes a lot to outfit a Notre Dame student — clothes, electronics and other various school supplies. Ever wonder who made all of those things?   On Wednesday, ND8 hosted an event in the Dooley Room of LaFortune where students could look up their “slavery footprint,” an estimation of the number of modern-day slaves involved with the production of the items they use. This event was the second in a month-long series focusing on the problems of human trafficking and modern day slavery.   Sophomore John Gibbons, co-president of ND8, said the goal is to take a holistic look at the issues so the various aspects of these global problems are brought to the attention of a larger audience. “A fair amount of the population knows so little about these problems,” Gibbons said. “Our main goal is to raise awareness about them so that it inspires people to think about it more and what they can do to help.”   All of the groups involved were motivated by a desire to increase awareness of these issues, inspiring students to help those affected and giving those students ways to respond. Rosie McDowell, director of International Community Based Learning and Outreach at the CSC, said the Center’s focus in the series was to help student groups to collaborate in order to better address social issues through the lens of Catholic Social Teaching.   “One of the things we try to do at the Center is to encourage collaboration among student groups, and to give them support and resources to move forward with educational events about social issues for the campus and in the community,” McDowell said. The series kicked off on Nov. 3 with a showing of the Invisible Children documentary “Tony,” which documented the struggle to end the use of child soldiers by the Lord’s Resistance Army in Uganda.   The St. Mary’s Invisible Children club and the Notre Dame club Inspire were heavily involved in bringing the film screening to campus.   Olevia Boykin, president of Inspire, said Invisible Children contacted her over the summer about doing a screening of “Tony” on Notre Dame’s campus. “We paired up with the CSC to bring this event to Notre Dame, and Rosie McDowell thought that the Invisible Children event could be a part of a larger conversation on human trafficking and modern day slavery,” Boykin said. Senior Sarah Commiskey, president of the Invisible Children club at Saint Mary’s, also focused her efforts at showing this documentary on campus.   “I wanted to spread the word, just really to advocate for Invisible Children, and in the best case scenario, turn apathy into action,” Commiskey said.  “I want to really get people so fired up that they do something about it.” Sophomore Erin Hattler, co-president of ND8, said students can get involved in the cause by donating to organizations Catholic Relief Services and by pressuring lawmakers to enact legislation protecting victims and to not cut the budget allotted for international aid.   “The bill [the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2011], originally passed in 2000, is currently making its way through the House and the Senate because it is due to expire at the end of this year,” she said. “We want to mobilize students to contact their representatives to encourage them to pass this bill.” Hattler said the bill provides crucial funding for programs aiding the victims of sexual trafficking, and is crucial in its ability to set the standard internationally for nations attempting to combat the problem. The goal of the groups involved with this series is not only to raise awareness, Gibbons said, but also to provide tangible ways for students to act.  “While we want to bring these harsh realities to life, at the same time we want to show that there are ways to work toward changing them,” he said. “We want to show people that there is hope and that there are ways to address these daunting problems.”last_img read more

What Arsene Wenger has told friends after receiving four job offers

first_imgArsene Wenger is preparing to return to football (Picture: Getty)Former Arsenal boss Arsene Wenger is reportedly ready to return to football in the next few weeks.The 69-year-old stepped down as Arsenal manager last summer after a record-breaking 22-year reign in north London and has been mulling over his next challenge, while occasionally appearing as a pundit for beIN SPORTS.Wenger has been linked with a number of high-profile positions and currently has four concrete job offers on the table, according to The Times.These include the role of director of football at Paris Saint-Germain, the head coach of a national team and offers from two of Europe’s elite clubs. AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityThe report claims Wenger has informed friends that he misses the everyday involvement with players and the Frenchman is making steps to return to the game.Wenger’s links to Qatar make him an obvious candidate for PSG and, if he does take on a role at the Parc des Princes, it’s not clear whether Antero Henrique would remain as sporting director. Unai Emery says inexperienced Arsenal will improveTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 9:35FullscreenUnai Emery says inexperienced Arsenal will improvehttps://metro.co.uk/video/unai-emery-says-inexperienced-arsenal-improve-1855686/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.MORE: Chelsea identify Everton winger Richarlison as potential Eden Hazard replacement Metro Sport ReporterThursday 7 Feb 2019 10:33 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link570Shares Advertisement Wenger stepped down as Arsenal manager last summer (Picture: Getty)Earlier this week, Emmanuel Petit slammed Arsenal’s transfer policy and questioned why the club replaced Wenger with Unai Emery.‘The frustration level must be very high for Emery,’ the former Arsenal midfielder told the Irish Independent.‘In only his second transfer window as Arsenal manager, he was told he cannot sign anybody.More: FootballBruno Fernandes responds to Man Utd bust-up rumours with Ole Gunnar SolskjaerNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira moves‘You look at the money Manchester United, Liverpool and Manchester City spend and unless you join them and put the cash on the table to compete for the best players, you are going nowhere.‘Tottenham are not spending money, but they are in the position Arsenal were in a few years ago building a stadium, but there is no excuse for Arsenal now.‘If you sack Arsene Wenger and then say to the guy who replaces him you have no money to spend on new players, I would ask what was the point of sacking Wenger in the first place?’center_img What Arsene Wenger has told friends after receiving four job offers Comment Advertisementlast_img read more

Doctor: ADHD Does Not Exist

first_imgTime 14 March 2014Over the course of my career, I have found more than 20 conditions that can lead to symptoms of ADHD, each of which requires its own approach to treatment. Raising a generation of children — and now adults — who can’t live without stimulants is no solutionThis Wednesday, an article in the New York Times reported that from 2008 to 2012 the number of adults taking medications for ADHD increased by 53% and that among young American adults, it nearly doubled. While this is a staggering statistic and points to younger generations becoming frequently reliant on stimulants, frankly, I’m not too surprised. Over my 50-year career in behavioral neurology and treating patients with ADHD, it has been in the past decade that I have seen these diagnoses truly skyrocket. Every day my colleagues and I see more and more people coming in claiming they have trouble paying attention at school or work and diagnosing themselves with ADHD.And why shouldn’t they?If someone finds it difficult to pay attention or feels somewhat hyperactive, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder has those symptoms right there in its name. It’s an easy catchall phrase that saves time for doctors to boot. But can we really lump all these people together? What if there are other things causing people to feel distracted? I don’t deny that we, as a population, are more distracted today than we ever were before. And I don’t deny that some of these patients who are distracted and impulsive need help. What I do deny is the generally accepted definition of ADHD, which is long overdue for an update. In short, I’ve come to believe based on decades of treating patients that ADHD — as currently defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and as understood in the public imagination — does not exist.Allow me to explain what I mean.Ever since 1937, when Dr. Charles Bradley discovered that children who displayed symptoms of attention deficit and hyperactivity responded well to Benzedrine, a stimulant, we have been thinking about this “disorder” in almost the same way. Soon after Bradley’s discovery, the medical community began labeling children with these symptoms as having minimal brain dysfunction, or MBD, and treating them with the stimulants Ritalin and Cylert. In the intervening years, the DSM changed the label numerous times, from hyperkinetic reaction of childhood (it wasn’t until 1980 that the DSM-III introduced a classification for adults with the condition) to the current label, ADHD. But regardless of the label, we have been giving patients different variants of stimulant medication to cover up the symptoms. You’d think that after decades of advancements in neuroscience, we would shift our thinking.Today, the fifth edition of the DSM only requires one to exhibit five of 18 possible symptoms to qualify for an ADHD diagnosis. If you haven’t seen the list, look it up. It will probably bother you. How many of us can claim that we have difficulty with organization or a tendency to lose things; that we are frequently forgetful or distracted or fail to pay close attention to details? Under these subjective criteria, the entire U.S. population could potentially qualify. We’ve all had these moments, and in moderate amounts they’re a normal part of the human condition.However, there are some instances in which attention symptoms are severe enough that patients truly need help. Over the course of my career, I have found more than 20 conditions that can lead to symptoms of ADHD, each of which requires its own approach to treatment. Among these are sleep disorders, undiagnosed vision and hearing problems, substance abuse (marijuana and alcohol in particular), iron deficiency, allergies (especially airborne and gluten intolerance), bipolar and major depressive disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and even learning disabilities like dyslexia, to name a few. Anyone with these issues will fit the ADHD criteria outlined by the DSM, but stimulants are not the way to treat them.What’s so bad about stimulants? you might wonder. They seem to help a lot of people, don’t they? The article in the Times mentions that the “drugs can temper hallmark symptoms like severe inattention and hyperactivity but also carry risks like sleep deprivation, appetite suppression and, more rarely, addiction and hallucinations.” But this is only part of the picture.First, addiction to stimulant medication is not rare; it is common. The drugs’ addictive qualities are obvious. We only need to observe the many patients who are forced to periodically increase their dosage if they want to concentrate. This is because the body stops producing the appropriate levels of neurotransmitters that ADHD meds replace — a trademark of addictive substances. I worry that a generation of Americans won’t be able to concentrate without this medication; Big Pharma is understandably not as concerned.Second, there are many side effects to ADHD medication that most people are not aware of: increased anxiety, irritable or depressed mood, severe weight loss due to appetite suppression, and even potential for suicide. But there are also consequences that are even less well known. For example, many patients on stimulants report having erectile dysfunction when they are on the medication.Third, stimulants work for many people in the short term, but for those with an underlying condition causing them to feel distracted, the drugs serve as Band-Aids at best, masking and sometimes exacerbating the source of the problem.In my view, there are two types of people who are diagnosed with ADHD: those who exhibit a normal level of distraction and impulsiveness, and those who have another condition or disorder that requires individual treatment.For my patients who are in the first category, I recommend that they eat right, exercise more often, get eight hours of quality sleep a night, minimize caffeine intake in the afternoon, monitor their cell-phone use while they’re working and, most important, do something they’re passionate about. Like many children who act out because they are not challenged enough in the classroom, adults whose jobs or class work are not personally fulfilling or who don’t engage in a meaningful hobby will understandably become bored, depressed and distracted. In addition, today’s rising standards are pressuring children and adults to perform better and longer at school and at work. I too often see patients who hope to excel on four hours of sleep a night with help from stimulants, but this is a dangerous, unhealthy and unsustainable way of living over the long term.For my second group of patients with severe attention issues, I require a full evaluation to find the source of the problem. Usually, once the original condition is found and treated, the ADHD symptoms go away.It’s time to rethink our understanding of this condition, offer more thorough diagnostic work and help people get the right treatment for attention deficit and hyperactivity.Dr. Richard Saul is a behavioral neurologist practicing in the Chicago area. His book, ADHD Does Not Exist, is published by HarperCollins.http://time.com/25370/doctor-adhd-does-not-exist/last_img read more