Saltwater turf

first_imgBy Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaImagine being able to water your home lawn with salt water. Yes,salt water.Thanks to the new seashore paspalum grasses, this isn’t a dreamfor those who live along the coast. Seashore paspalum cantolerate a wide quality range of water, including seawater,brackish water and recycled water.”The grass requires only minimal pesticides and judiciousapplications of fertilizers,” said Clint Waltz, a turf specialistwith the University of Georgia College of Agricultural andEnvironmental Sciences.The grass uses key fertilizer nutrients efficiently, Waltz said.It can easily be managed to comply with many environmental waterregulations.Coastal golf coursesRetired UGA professor Ronny Duncan bred a number of seashorepaspalum grasses. They’re being used on golf courses along theGeorgia coast and in Hawaii and Guam.”Aside from its uses as an athletic turf, seashore paspalum maybe used to clean up polluted or contaminated waters or soils,”Waltz said.”It may be effectively used to transition into wetland sites orother environmentally sensitive areas,” he said. This can helpreduce pollution from industrial or other problem areas.Update in SavannahWaltz and others from UGA, the University of Florida and theGeorgia Department of Natural Resources will present an update,”Seashore Paspalum: The Environmental Steward,” Oct. 15 at theCoastal Georgia Center in Savannah.Duncan will be on hand to provide a history of seashore paspalum.UGA agronomist Bob Carrow will discuss its characteristics andwater conservation qualities. And he’ll tell how to manage thegrass.Other sessions will look at seashore paspalum as a recreational,amenity or forage grass or for land reclamation, stabilization,bioremediation and other uses.DetailsThe update was planned by the Georgia Center for UrbanAgriculture and the Coastal Resources Division of DNR. It beginswith registration at 8 a.m. The program starts at 8:30 and endsat 5 p.m.The cost is $50 before Oct. 4 or $60 after that. To preregisteror learn more about the update, call the UGA Griffin campusOffice of Continuing Education at (770) 229-3477.To learn more about the UGA seashore paspalum breeding program,see www.georgiaturf.comon-line.(Sharon Omahen is a news editor with the University of GeorgiaCollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

Editorial: Prime obligation lies with parents

first_imgDominion Post 12 Dec 2012Poverty harmful to children. No-one will dispute the central tenet of the child poverty report released this week by Children’s Commissioner Russell Wills.Kids who go to school hungry struggle to learn. Kids who live in damp, cold, crowded homes get sick. Kids  who grow up poor are more likely to struggle as adults.Where readers may be inclined to part company with the commissioner’s expert advisory group is over how to tackle the problem.The authors, who include prominent academics as well as Business New Zealand chief executive Phil O’Reilly and Salvation Army social policy director Major Campbell Roberts, pay lip service to the notion of reciprocal obligations. They say they were guided  by the notion of a ”social contract” that recognises the mutual responsibilities of parents, the community and wider society.However, when it comes to the pointy end of the exercise they have a  lot to say to the Government and nothing to say to parents. The report contains 78 recommendations. Seventy-eight of those are directed at the Government; none are directed at parents.It is, the group appears to believe, the state’s responsibility to ensure that every child has the opportunity to fulfil its potential. That is not possible.  The state cannot be a surrogate parent. It cannot provide love, it cannot offer encouragement and  it cannot set boundaries.http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/comment/editorials/8070631/Editorial-Prime-obligation-lies-with-parentslast_img read more