Library launches research data collaborative

first_img Read Full Story The Harvard Library, in collaboration with the Office of the Provost, IQSS Dataverse Network and HUIT, is launching the Research Data Collaborative (RDC) to develop research data management services. The RDC program’s FY14 goals include creation of tiered data management training for researchers and librarians, a University-wide data compliance network, effective data management plan support and an assessment of the data storage and curation needs of Harvard researchers.The RDC program members will provide training materials along with workshops that broadly address research data management. Topics such as data security, storage, archiving, preservation and curation will be covered, in addition to data advisory services regarding retention and compliance policies. A University-wide survey and assessment will lay the groundwork for effective data management support services for a Harvard audience.The program is led by Gosia Stergios and a team of 17.The RDC is actively recruiting team members from the University community.Learn more about the program and its teams by clicking on the story link below.last_img read more

All aboard for cheap accommodation

first_imgVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:29Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:29 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenCheapest Brisbane suburbs to rent by train station00:29You don’t have to go broke in inner-Brisbane renting near a train station. Photo: Yuri KouzminIf you want a bargain rental close to public transport, Salisbury or Rocklea should be on your hit list, according to data released by flat-sharing site Flatmates.com.au.The company has released analysis identifying the ten Brisbane train stations within 10km of the CBD with the cheapest surrounding rental rooms.Thomas Clements, CEO of Flatmates, said Brisbane renters were sharing homes to reduce expenses, and they haven’t had to move far from the CBD.“With rental prices and competition for properties in Brisbane continuing to rise, it’s not surprising more people are seeking shared accommodation as a way to cut down on rent,” Clements said.`More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home4 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor4 hours agoSalisbury, just 11 stops from Central Station, topped the list with rooms to rent averaging $145 per week.Rocklea Station, in Brisbane’s south, came in second cheapest at $153 per week for rooms.Among the top ten, the station closest to town was Enoggera at 6.5 kilometres from Brisbane’s heart and with rooms that fetched $175 per week.The numbers also highlight Brisbane’s affordability appeal compared to Sydney.That New South Wale’s capital’s cheapest station location was Hurlestone Park, 9.2 kilometres from the CBD and with an average rate of $247 per week.“Proximity to public transport is an important factor when finding a home for many sharers, which can see rooms and rentals close to stations being more expensive than elsewhere,” Clements said.“The good news is that there are still a number of suburbs within 10 kilometres of the CBD that offer affordable room rents close to a train station, that won’t see sharers sacrificing on commute times or lifestyle options.”last_img

Why fathers have post-natal depression

first_imgHealthLifestyle Why fathers have post-natal depression by: – May 28, 2011 24 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! By Philippa RoxbyHealth reporter, BBC NewsMen can feel the stress and responsibility of fatherhood weighing heavily on their shouldersA Gloucester man has been acquitted of murdering his six-month-old daughter, after saying he had had post-natal depression. The case of Mark Bruton-Young has put the issue of men who struggle to cope with becoming fathers in the headlines.One out of every seven new mothers has post-natal depression – but, according to the Fatherhood Institute, one out of every 10 fathers are depressed both before and after their baby is born.The peak time for fathers’ depression is thought to be between three and six months after the birth.Like women, they can struggle with the huge life changes a baby brings, says Fatherhood Institute research head Adrienne Burgess.“Hormones, lack of sleep, increased responsibility and general life stresses can apply to men just as much to women,” she said.“And if their partner is depressed, then men are more likely to be too.”Men and women who have pre-existing mental health problems are more at risk of developing depression after the birth of a child.But a father’s depression can begin during pregnancy, when relationships are already changing. Fathers can feel left out while their partner is the focus of increased attention.Association for Post-natal Illness counsellor Liz Wise says: “Women can feel they do things best, like changing a nappy or feeding.“They can be quick to criticise their partners and take over.“They don’t think about how it could undermine a man’s confidence.“In the end their partner will stop offering to help and that could lead to a breakdown of communication and then resentment.”It has also been suggested fatherhood is not recognised as a life-changing event, the way motherhood is.Ms Burgess finds it shocking that fathers are not invited to ante-natal appointments.“When the pregnancy is confirmed, the GP should invite the mother and father to come in.“We need a directive that says you should ask about the women’s partner too.“That way they can pick up if he has any issues.“Then they’re more likely to be able to assess the more vulnerable men.”Both mothers and fathers can feel tired, stressed, emotional, inadequate and guilty as a result of being depressed – but they react to those feelings in different ways, which can make picking up the signs more difficult.It is said that men with depression get mad, while women get sad.Drinking too much, self-medicating and having affairs can all be signs of fathers with depression, say experts.“Men are probably better at bullying the world around them when they are not happy, whereas women tend to internalise more,” says Phillip Hodson, fellow of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy.Research also indicates children are at increased risk of emotional and behavioural problems in families where fathers are depressed soon after the birth, the impact can be traced up to the age of 11, and boys are more affected than girls.“If you’re really seriously, clinically depressed you care about nothing,” says Mr Hodson.“Depression is the worst pain imaginable and it’s almost inevitable that someone else has to get involved to get you out of it.”The key is to access that support at the earliest available opportunity.Counselling, psychotherapy, cranial osteopathy, massage and reflexology are all seen as potentially therapeutic, as well as resting, eating properly and writing down feelings in a journal.Ms Wise says men should be treated in the same way as women.“We tell them it’s not uncommon, it’s nothing to be ashamed of and we give them as much information as we can.“Sometimes just acknowledging it works, and counselling and talking about it helps too.”Parenting charity the National Childbirth Trust has produced a leaflet for fathers, called Becoming a Parent.It says: “Remember dads can also suffer from the depression, brought on by anxiety about their new circumstances.“Don’t bottle it up. Speak to your partner and your family and friends. Find out if there are dads’ groups locally that you could meet with.”BBC News Tweetcenter_img Share Share Sharelast_img read more