Akyeampong named faculty director at Center for African Studies

first_imgEmmanuel Kwaku Akyeampong, professor of history and of African and African-American studies, has been named the Oppenheimer Faculty Director at the Center for African Studies.Akyeampong, who joined Harvard faculty in 1993, is senior historian of Africa at Harvard, specializing in West Africa, Islam in Sub-Saharan Africa, comparative slavery, social history of alcohol, disease and medicine, ecology, the African diaspora, political economy and trade, and social and cultural history.The author of “Drink, Power, and Cultural Change: A Social History of Alcohol in Ghana, C. 1800 to Recent Times” and “Between the Sea and the Lagoon: An Eco-Social History of the Anlo of the Southeastern Ghana, c. 1850 to Recent Times,” Akyeampong was instrumental in creating Harvard’s Department of African and African American Studies with Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research. He has also edited several books including “Dictionary of African Biography ” (with Gates) and “The Culture of Mental Illness and Psychiatric Practice in Africa” (with Allan Hill, Andelot Professor of Demography Emeritus at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Arthur Kleinman, professor of medical anthropology at Harvard Medical School).Akyeampong is co-founder of the Ghana-based International Institute for the Advanced Study of Cultures, Institutions and Economic Enterprise. He is also a graduate of Andover Newton Theological School, and serves as an affiliate minister for outreach at Acton Congregational Church.His appointment begins July 1.last_img read more

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COVID-19: TNI ready for worst-case scenario, prepares security contingency plan

first_imgHe further said that the outbreak was not only a health issue as it was also related to other aspects, such as social, political and economic, of peoples’ lives.Read also: Uneasy calm descends on empty Jakarta as capital makes it through first day of social restrictionsThe TNI has also proposed a budget to support its contingency plans through the Defense Ministry that was presented during a meeting with House of Representatives Commission I, which oversees defense affairs, Sisriadi told The Jakarta Post on Wednesday.He did not elaborate further on the budget, but said the TNI would have enough funding to face the potential security turmoil for five months if the budget proposal was approved, including collaborating with the National Police in security, public order and law enforcement operations. “The TNI is organized as a ‘war organization that can function well [during] peacetime and emergencies’ […], so it is understandable that the military leaders on all levels will always respond to the latest situations and prepare to face the worst situation,” he said.Sisriadi explained that the force would also prepare medical assistance to mitigate the outbreak, including preparing 109 of its health facilities to be used as referral hospitals in the regions and dispatching its medical and paramedical units in the field.“New cases are still emerging in some areas and there are still no signs that we are reaching the peak of the outbreak,” he said.The Executive Office of the President has also braced itself for potential social and security conflicts caused by the increase in unemployment, with the National Police’s Security Intelligence Agency (Baintelkam) confirming the risk of riots and crimes in a time of crisis.The government has estimated that up to 3.78 million Indonesians will fall into poverty and 5.2 million will lose their jobs during the coronavirus pandemic.Topics : The Indonesian Military (TNI) is prepared for any potential social unrest stemming from the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic that has forced businesses to shut their operations and put millions out of work.TNI spokesman Maj. Gen. Sisriadi said the military was preparing a security contingency plan to face the worst-case scenario.“We’ve prepared troops to face the impact of social unrest that could lead to violence. So that we can minimize any security problems,” he said in an online discussion held by Jakarta Defense Studies on Tuesday as reported by kompas.com.last_img read more