GreeND hosts marchers for climate action

first_imgIn conjunction with the arrival of forty marchers, who stopped at Notre Dame on Saturday as part of the Great March for Climate Action, GreeND hosted a panel discussion and film screening in the Hesburgh Auditorium.Garrett Blad, president of GreeND, said the movie, titled “Disruption,” was great in describing the history and science of climate change.“It really goes into the interconnectedness of the issue and how the People’s Climate March is really trying to get a broad array of groups involved,” he said.Following the screening of the film, two professors and one marcher discussed the short- and long-term implications of climate change.“The film is very impressive, in the historical sweep of the view that it’s giving and looking back at previous attempts to engage issues that can really be so punishing … as well as the attention to the emotional component and how they kind of mobilize the grassroots here to build towards a global movement, which leads to an impressive intersectional approach,” sociology and peace studies professor Ann Mische said.Saint Mary’s political science professor Sonalini Sapra organized a screening of “Disruption” last week at the College in preparation for this week’s event.“The focus on not just a climate treaty, but a just climate treaty is really something the documentary seems to emphasize,” she said. “And so what does a just climate treaty look like? Who gets to be part of those conversations? I mean, I know that India and China, their leaders, have already said they are not going to come to the climate meetings on Sept. 23 that [United Nations Secretary General] Ban Ki-Moon has organized. So one of my questions is what would a just climate treaty even really look like?”The Great March for Climate Action began in March, when forty people from all over the United States left Los Angeles, hoping to arrive in Washington, D.C. by November 1st.“One of the reasons I’m doing this, and I think we’re all doing this, is because climate change really is one of the largest issues facing our world today,” marcher Jimmy Betts said.Born in South Korea and raised in Nebraska, Betts has walked with the march since it started in Los Angeles and was included as one of the speakers on the panel.“This is a huge mobilization that will officially last,” he said. “But the real work is going to come after the march. That’s where all this uniting is going to really come to this political will, this power that we essentially created, and we have to take it.”All of the marchers shared the similar sentiment of an increasingly pressing need for climate change reform.“We have to do this as a collective society, it can’t just be two outspoken environmental organizations, that’s way too narrow,” he said. “It affects far more people than just environmentalists, but unfortunately that’s sort of how it’s been polarized in the past.”Tags: Climate change, climate treaty, Disruption, environment, Great March for Climate Action, GreeND, People’s Climate March, reformlast_img read more

PilatesSpace opens a Studio in Burlington, Vermont

first_imgPilatesSpace opens a Studio in Burlington, VermontNew Studio Features Vermonts First Access to the Gyrotonic® Expansion SystemBurlington PilatesSpace, a fitness and physical therapy studio, announces today the opening of its new space at 208 Flynn Avenue in Burlington. PilatesSpace offers private, semi-private and group sessions in Pilates. Pilates, a conditioning program developed by Joseph Pilates in the 1920s, uses specialized equipment and mat exercises to improve strength, flexibility, breathing function, posture and coordination. PilatesSpace also offers Gyrotonic®, yoga, massage, and physical therapy.The 2000 square foot studio in the 208 building on Flynn Avenue, includes mat space and 15 pieces of Pilates equipment, the largest most well-equipped studio in Vermont. PilatesSpace also features the Gyrotonic® Expansion System, which has been featured in USA Today and Time Magazine. These exercises are popular among dancers and athletes. It has also been used in Germany to help elderly patients with osteoporosis and spinal injuries. PilatesSpace is the first studio in Vermont to offer sessions with this specialized equipment. PilatesSpace also shares space with Every Woman Physical Therapy, which provides physical therapy services exclusively for women including pool therapy in the 120 square foot indoor heated aquatic therapy pool.Owner Pamela Stone, MSPT, says, The new space allows us to expand and be more convenient to Burlington residents. Our goal is for clients to have a personalized workout in a safe environment with full awareness in the moment. This bright and beautiful new space will allow us to give clients that kind of experience.Pamela Stone is a physical therapist certified in the Gyrotonic Expansion System® and the Polestar Pilates Rehabilitation Curriculum. Her interest in functional movement and bodies in balance developed during her 20 years as a dancer and led her to pursue a Master of Science in Physical Therapy from Regis University in Denver, Colorado. Since 1998, Pamela has practiced Physical Therapy, Pilates and Gyrotonic®. Pamela directed Pilates Vermont at the Shelburne Athletic Club for two years before starting PilatesSpace.For more information, visit www.pilatesspace.net(link is external) or call 802.863.9900.last_img read more

WHO, Asian leaders discuss virus sharing, vaccine access

first_imgEditor’s note: Because of a technical problem, this story was not published until Mar 27.Mar 26, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) opened a meeting with Asian health officials in Jakarta today to hear their concerns about access to H5N1 influenza vaccines and discuss solutions that might allow researchers to regain unrestricted access to H5N1 samples.Indonesia brought the issue to the forefront in February when it announced it would send no more H5N1 samples to the WHO until it received assurances that the strains would not be used by private companies to make vaccines that the country couldn’t afford.Though some countries and health officials support Indonesia’s use of the virus samples as leverage to gain access to H5N1 vaccines, others have charged that Indonesia is impeding global efforts to chart the spread of the disease, track genetic mutations, and develop new vaccines.In his opening remarks at the 2-day conference today, which were e-mailed to journalists, David Heymann, the WHO’s acting director-general for communicable diseases, said responsible virus sharing requires both unrestricted access to novel influenza viruses and equitable access to pandemic vaccines that result from the sharing.Heymann defended the WHO’s history of coordinating vaccine development and production on behalf of developing nations. In 1997 the WHO responded to a major meningitis outbreak in sub-Saharan Africa by mobilizing the production and distribution of 3 million doses of vaccine.”To date, more than 20 million doses of meningococcal vaccine have been channeled through the International Coordinating Group mechanism, and improvements in surveillance have occurred because the prospect of having access to vaccine is a compelling incentive to report cases,” Heymann said. A similar mechanism was recently established to coordinate stockpiling and distribution of yellow fever vaccine for Latin America and Africa, he added.The Jakarta meeting will allow the WHO and the 18 Asian nations to discuss not only virus-sharing proposals that will be debated at the World Health Assembly in May, but also obligations that countries have under the revised International Health Regulations, which take effect in June, Heymann said.He predicted the meeting would bring discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of material-transfer agreements and other virus-sharing mechanisms, “and it will become clear that most of these mechanisms would impede rather than facilitate the world’s risk assessment and preparedness for an influenza pandemic.”Indonesian Health Minister Siti Fadilah Supari has asked the WHO for a binding guarantee that H5N1 samples won’t be used to develop commercial vaccines priced out of the country’s reach. Indonesia also signed a memorandum of understanding with US vaccine producer Baxter International that laid the groundwork for future collaborations or supply agreements.At the meeting today, Supari told reporters that if Indonesia had its own WHO collaborating center and vaccine factory, it would not need to send viruses outside the country, the Associated Press reported.The WHO said last week that projects to establish flu-vaccine manufacturing capacities in up to six developing countries—four in Asia and two in Latin America—were “in the final stage of approval.” Japan and the United States have provided $18 million toward the effort, the WHO said. But Heymann’s prepared speech did not mention those projects.US Health and Human Services Secretary Mike Leavitt said in a Mar 23 press release that the United States provided $10 million toward the WHO’s vaccine supply expansion plan. “Responding to a pandemic demands the cooperation of the world community, as no nation can go it alone. If a country is to protect its own people, it must work together with other nations to protect the people of the world,” he said.Heymann said solutions for improving H5N1 vaccine access in developing countries will require both short- and long-term measures, which could include:National stockpilesVirtual stockpiles—certain amounts of pandemic vaccine that producers would set aside for the WHO to buy for developing countriesFill-and-finish operations that allow developing countries to package bulk vaccine from manufacturersTechnology-transfer agreements like those used for the conjugate meningitis vaccine, which would allow developing countries to add to the world’s flu vaccine supply.See also:Mar 22 CIDRAP News story “WHO: Six developing countries may get flu vaccine plants”Mar 23 HHS press releasehttp://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2007pres/03/20070323e.htmllast_img read more

Updated Hawthorne home hits the market

first_imgOne of the many entertaining areas at 61 Dover St, Hawthorne.“It was just a normal night, and we were sitting out on the deck and he just proposed,” Mrs Devlin said.“This is also the first house we brought our two-year-old son Timmy home to.” The home at 61 Dover St, Hawthorne.Moving on from 61 Dover St will be hard for Sam and Victoria Devlin, with it being the birthplace of many memories.Not long after moving into the two-level Hawthorne home, Mr Devlin proposed to his now wife. The new kitchen is both stylish and functional.Upstairs there is an open plan kitchen and living, two more living spaces, a powder room, another bedroom and a master with ensuite and robe.Mrs Devlin said one of her favourite spaces in the home was outdoors on the deck.“We’ve had so many amazing parties,” she said. “There’s so much outdoor entertaining space so our friends always come here.” Open plan living, kitchen and dining.She said while she loved the home, it was time to sink her teeth into another challenge.“We want to have more kids and find our forever house,” she said.“We feel like it’s time for the next project.”Mrs Devlin said the house was great for professionals who loved entertaining, with access to the CityCat nearby, and it would also be perfect for those looking to downsize.center_img Beautiful bay windows with nook seating is featured in the home.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020The house has been extensively renovated, with a new kitchen, lighting and flooring, along with major landscaping and a fresh lick of paint inside and out.Mrs Devlin said they wanted to keep the character of the 1930s Queenslander, but give it a modern and relaxing touch.“Once you’re in the house you feel like you’re in your own little sanctuary,” she said.The lower floor has three bedrooms, a bathroom, a laundry, two living areas and a double lockup garage. Modern bathrooms feature in the home.last_img read more

Attempt at candy theft becomes murder charge

first_imgPeterson, who is being held in lieu of $986,000 bail, is scheduled to be arraigned next month on one count of murder. His attorney, Tyson Beers, declined to comment on the case. Hairston, a Lancaster resident, was outside the Lancaster 99 Cents store July 14 collecting donations for a group that assists the homeless when Peterson, his girlfriend and another couple went inside the store, LaForteza said. Store employees saw them taking candy and tried to stop them, LaForteza said. “As Peterson goes into his car to try to drive away, and one of the employees tries to write down the license plate (number), the defendant backs up and nearly hits the employee,” LaForteza said. “Then the victim Hairston pushed a shopping cart into the car to stop it.” Peterson was angry and yelled at the victim as he drove off in his Dodge Neon, LaForteza said. Afraid that he would return, store staff members called sheriff’s deputies and saw Peterson stop across the street to look at the damage to his car, LaForteza said. A short time later, Peterson did return and got into an argument with Hairston over the car damage. He chased Hairston into the store and hurled a shopping cart that hit an employee, the prosecutor said. Peterson threw a container of carpet deodorizer at Hairston, hitting him in the back, and then picked up a glass jar of salsa, LaForteza said. “From 6 to 8 feet away, he throws it, very hard, and strikes the victim on the head,” LaForteza said. Deputies arrived and arrested Peterson, who four days later pleaded guilty to misdemeanor burglary and assault with a deadly weapon and was sentenced to 30 days in jail and placed on three years’ probation. That night, Hairston declined medical treatment, but three days later went to a hospital complaining of a headache, LaForteza said. Doctors diagnosed him as having a subdural hematoma, or bruising inside his head, and said he needed surgery, LaForteza said. After saying he wanted to discuss the matter first with his family, Hairston underwent surgery on July 20, according to the prosecutor. He remained in the hospital until Aug. 2, when he died of complications of blunt-force head trauma, LaForteza said. The murder charge against Peterson was filed in February, according to court records. [email protected] (661) 267-5744 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! LANCASTER – The case of 18-year-old Joseph Peterson started out as a relatively minor affair involving the alleged theft of M&Ms and Twizzlers from a discount store – but ended up as murder, according to prosecutors. When the Lancaster man tried to flee after what police called a petty theft, Charles Hairston, a 51-year-old homeless group volunteer, tried to stop him. Peterson threw a bottle of salsa at him, hitting him in the head. Hairston died three weeks later. “It’s a sad story. (Hairston) was a good Samaritan who tried to help out, and unfortunately with these circumstances, he was killed,” Deputy District Attorney Bernie LaForteza said. last_img read more