The Deets: Nick Bosa’s already the 49ers’ best defender and Dee Ford is nearing “bust” territory

first_imgConsidering how fast media and fans want to hand out grades following the NFL Draft, I don’t feel at all premature in making a declaration:Nick Bosa, the No. 2 overall pick in last April’s NFL Draft, has been an A-plus pick for the 49ers.Yes, he’s only played three games, but what more do you need to see to know that he was the best possible selection the 49ers could have made in the spring?And this might put me out on a limb, but as I argued on KNBR Tonight on Monday, the rookie has been …last_img

Disabled South Africans: know your rights – Infographic

first_imgSouth Africa has progressive policies to protect and uplift the disabled. For Human Rights Month, we take a look at how disabled South Africans are included in the workplace and in society.Research and text: Shamin ChibbaDesign: Sachin BabooClick on the image for a larger view.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img

Dairy feed bunk management

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The current state of the dairy economy has dairy farm managers looking for ways to improve cow productivity and reduce expenses. One management area that may offer some of these returns is the feed bunk. It is important to work with the herd nutritionist to provide a ration that will allow the dairy cow to produce a high level of milk, but beyond the nutrient composition of the ration, the manager must understand and work with cow feeding behavior to promote maximum dry matter intake (DMI). The following comments are based upon an eXtension article entitled “The Feeding Behavior of Dairy Cows: Considerations to Improve Cow Welfare and Productivity.”Dairy cows managed in an indoor production system typically spend 4 to 6 hours per day eating, ideally divided into 9 to 14 separate meals or feeding sessions. The delivery of fresh feed is a major stimulus to cow feeding and research demonstrates that the 60 minutes following fresh fed delivery produces a peak feeding pattern. Research has also shown that there is benefit to coordinating the delivery of fresh feed with a return from the milking parlor. Cows that had access to feed after milking stood longer (48 versus 21 minutes) than cows that did not have access to feed after returning from milking. The additional standing time is beneficial from the standpoint of providing adequate time for the teat sphincter muscle to fully close, thus reducing the risk of intramammary infection from exposure to environmental bacteria when cows lie down too soon after milking. Based on this research, adding an additional fresh fed delivery could help to improve DMI intake or, more likely, result in a more even feeding time distribution.  Increased feed delivery can reduce diurnal fluctuations in rumen pH and possibly reduce the risk of subacute ruminal acidosis in some situations.If an additional fresh fed delivery is out of the question, more frequent feed push-up is another management practice that can offer a number of benefits, including higher DMI, greater fat-corrected milk yields, less feed refusal, and an increase in standing time after milking. Typically, sorting occurs by the first cows to eat the freshly delivered feed, which create holes in the feed pile. Cows that eat later do not have the same ration consistency as those first cows. Pushing feed up remixes the feed pile, which provides a better ration to those cows that follow the first eaters. When feed is pushed up, it can also stimulate another feeding session for the cows, creating another meal opportunity. The goal is to get cows to eat more frequent, smaller meals throughout the day. This creates a better pH balance within the rumen as compared to a situation where cows slug feed with fewer, larger meals.  Slug feeding can disrupt rumen pH balance and lead to milk fat depression. After the initial feeding period, the feed bunk piles are often scattered, providing a large surface area for oxygen to degrade the forage portion of the ration, in particular ensiled forages. Pushing feed up puts feed back into piles with less surface area, which can help to prevent or reduce heating and reduce feed waste by refusal.  If feed is not delivered after milking, then pushing up feed after milking can stimulate cows to eat and increase standing time after milking, allowing more time for the teat canal to close.A final factor to look at to help improve the DMI and distribution of feeding times and meals for cows is stocking density. The eXtension article says, “recent research suggests that overcrowding at the feed bunk may have deleterious effects on feeding behavior.”  In 2000, Batchelder (Proceedings from Dairy Housing and Equipment Systems: Managing and Planning for Profitability, Camp Hill, Pennsylvania) reported that using 30% overcrowding (1.3 cows/headlock) reduced daily DMI and resulted in substantially fewer cows eating during both the hour following milking and following delivery of fresh feed. Other research has shown that in overcrowding situations, cows will stand and wait for a feeding spot.  Increased standing times are associated with a higher risk of developing hoof and leg injuries. In addition, some researchers have noted increased aggression in feeding areas when cows are overcrowded and this behavior can lead to higher incidences of hoof lesion development and lameness.Dairy managers have opportunities to increase productivity and reduce costs by improving feed bunk management to take advantage of cow feeding behaviors.last_img read more

A corn market rally is hard to justify

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLCThere are so many negative factors affecting the corn market right now, it’s difficult justifying any market rally. Weather is always a wild card for the market in either direction especially this early in the season. The funds have a record short position right now, but farmers are really long, so a rally isn’t guaranteed. While no two market years are ever the same, I find it’s helpful to review historical trends to gain perspective or insight.From this point forward in the year the market has eventually seen a nice rally over the last 4 years:2018 — December corn posted a low on 4/20, then rallied 27 cents until 5/242017 — December corn posted a low on 4/21, then rallied 38 cents until 7/112016 — December corn posted a low on 4/25, then rallied 70 cents until 6/172015 — December corn went 20 cents lower from 4/20 until 6/15, then increased 70 cents by 7/11Finishing up my final 2017 Cash SalesLast August I still had 35% of my 2017 crop, stored at home but hedged with sales against the September futures. Instead of setting basis at -.43 picked up on the farm last summer, I continued to store my grain at home and collected market carry, hoping for better basis in the spring. To capture the carry, I “rolled” the futures I had sold against the September to December futures and captured 15 cents of market carry. Then in late November I rolled those sales forward again to July ‘19 futures, picking up another 27 cents of market carry profit.Last week I discussed how I made a basis sale at -.28 against the May. Instead of applying that sale to the ’18 crop I’m actually going to apply it to what I had left of the ’17 crop.With the basis sale being against the May futures, I need to account for rolling the spread from July back to May, which was at a 9-cent spread. Because the market is in a carry, it means the 9-cent spread between the July where my futures were hedged and May futures in which the basis was set against will show up as a loss in my hedge account. Was it more profitable to sell my grain this spring compared to last summer?Basis Profit: -43 cents vs. -28 cents = +15 centsMarket Carry: 15 cents + 27 cents = +42 centsMarket Carry Loss: = -9 centsTotal Profit = +48 centsBut there are additional costs to hold the grain that long. CapacityI have to have more than 100% bin space capacity at home to do this. Currently I can get a 7-year bin loan that costs 25 cents per bushel per year on the type of bins I have recently built. Handling, shrink and fumigationStoring and handling the corn for more than one year requires that I run the fans on the bin in the late summer and fall to keep the corn in condition. My shrink factor is minor because I can blend overly dry corn from one bin with slightly wetter corn in another. If I couldn’t blend, I would have to add the cost for shrink loss on the dry corn and/or the discounts of loading out wet corn. Insects could be an issue affecting grain quality too, and there could be fumigation costs that need to be considered. InterestThe interest cost to not pay down my operating note from the sale of grain on September 1st last year also needs to be considered.My corn’s cash value last September was: $3.20Current operating interest rates: 6%Cost per bushel per month to not pay down the operating note: 1.6 centsTime spent holding grain in bin (September to Mid – April): 7.5 monthsTotal interest cost to wait: 12 centsConclusion: Storing grain more than 1 year was MORE profitableNet Profit from Trade: +48 centsBin Ownership Costs: -25 centsHandling Costs: -4 centsInterest Cost: -12 centsProfit: 6 centsThis was my second year of having extra bin space to make this type of trade. It was also the second year in a row that I have made money holding some of my grain from one marketing year to another. While the bin cost is reducing my profits this year it allows for me to build equity on the ownership of more than 100% bin capacity on my farm. Once those bins are paid off that cost becomes a huge profit potential for me over the life of that bin.The market usually pays for corn to be stored forward in time, so owning a grain bin is the best return on investment on my farm. And while storing grain longer than 1 year can increase corn quality risk, a little bit of management goes a long way to reduce potential issues. For me the increased profitability and flexibility on-farm storage provides outweighs its disadvantages. Please email [email protected] with any questions or to learn more. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results.last_img read more

Patent Protection? Google Bids Nearly $1 Billion for Nortel’s Patents

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Our current patent system is a mess, many industry observers contend, and the number of patent lawsuits currently underway regarding technology IP borders on the ridiculous. To say that everyone is suing everyone doesn’t feel like much of an exaggeration. Microsoft, Oracle, Apple, RIM, Motorola, Google, and more – all suing or being sued.For its part, Google has long tried to take the moral higher ground, if you will, criticizing patent trolls (those who buy patents in order to file suits and profit without actually developing the technology themselves). Google has argued that the current patent system stifles innovation. Indeed, the company has found itself on the receiving end of plenty of lawsuits, most notably in recent months, by Oracle, which is accusing Google of infringing on the company’s Java patents in the development of Android.That history makes Google’s announcement today a little surprising, perhaps. Google says it is spending almost a billion dollars in a bid to acquire patent rights from Nortel, which filed for bankruptcy in 2009.Nortel and Google have entered into a “stalking horse” asset sale agreement that will include all of the former’s remaining patents and patent applications for $900 million. This will involve approximately 6,000 patents, spanning wireless, wireless 4G, data networking, optical, voice, internet, service provider, semiconductors and other patent portfolios. According to a statement from Nortel, this “extensive patent portfolio touches nearly every aspect of telecommunications and additional markets as well, including Internet search and social networking.”Google has called for reform of the patent process, but in announcing the agreement today, Google seems to recognize that while reform is the long-term solution, that stance will do little good in the short-term. “As things stand today,” writes Kent Walker, Google Senior VP and General Counsel, “one of a company’s best defenses against this kind of litigation is (ironically) to have a formidable patent portfolio, as this helps maintain your freedom to develop new products and services.”Describing itself as a “relatively young company” without a sizable patent portfolio, Walker says that Google hopes that the acquisition of Nortel’s patent will “create a disincentive for others to sue Google.” Hopefully, Walker adds that it will help those involved in projects like Android and Chrome to continue to innovate. Of course, that argument runs counter to what Google has long maintained about the patent process. But if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts Tags:#Google#NYT#web center_img audrey watters Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more