Indian Navy Strengthens Ties with Oman

first_img Indian Naval Ships Deepak, Delhi, Tabar and Trishul are currently visiting Muscat, Oman, to enhance bilateral ties.The vessels entered Muscat, Oman, on September 19 and are scheduled to continue their deployment on September 22.During the visit, the warships will have professional interactions with the defence forces for enhancing co-operation and sharing the nuances of naval operations including disaster management and combating maritime threats of terrorism and piracy. Apart from professional interactions, sports and social engagements are also planned, which are aimed at enhancing co-operation and understanding between the Navies.The ships are part of the Indian Navy’s Western Fleet based at Mumbai and are on a long range deployment to the Persian Gulf to enhance bilateral ties with regional navies.[mappress mapid=”16966″]Image: Indian Navy September 21, 2015 Authorities Back to overview,Home naval-today Indian Navy Strengthens Ties with Oman Indian Navy Strengthens Ties with Oman View post tag: middle east View post tag: Indian Navy View post tag: Oman Share this articlelast_img read more

WHO, Asian leaders discuss virus sharing, vaccine access

first_imgEditor’s note: Because of a technical problem, this story was not published until Mar 27.Mar 26, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) opened a meeting with Asian health officials in Jakarta today to hear their concerns about access to H5N1 influenza vaccines and discuss solutions that might allow researchers to regain unrestricted access to H5N1 samples.Indonesia brought the issue to the forefront in February when it announced it would send no more H5N1 samples to the WHO until it received assurances that the strains would not be used by private companies to make vaccines that the country couldn’t afford.Though some countries and health officials support Indonesia’s use of the virus samples as leverage to gain access to H5N1 vaccines, others have charged that Indonesia is impeding global efforts to chart the spread of the disease, track genetic mutations, and develop new vaccines.In his opening remarks at the 2-day conference today, which were e-mailed to journalists, David Heymann, the WHO’s acting director-general for communicable diseases, said responsible virus sharing requires both unrestricted access to novel influenza viruses and equitable access to pandemic vaccines that result from the sharing.Heymann defended the WHO’s history of coordinating vaccine development and production on behalf of developing nations. In 1997 the WHO responded to a major meningitis outbreak in sub-Saharan Africa by mobilizing the production and distribution of 3 million doses of vaccine.”To date, more than 20 million doses of meningococcal vaccine have been channeled through the International Coordinating Group mechanism, and improvements in surveillance have occurred because the prospect of having access to vaccine is a compelling incentive to report cases,” Heymann said. A similar mechanism was recently established to coordinate stockpiling and distribution of yellow fever vaccine for Latin America and Africa, he added.The Jakarta meeting will allow the WHO and the 18 Asian nations to discuss not only virus-sharing proposals that will be debated at the World Health Assembly in May, but also obligations that countries have under the revised International Health Regulations, which take effect in June, Heymann said.He predicted the meeting would bring discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of material-transfer agreements and other virus-sharing mechanisms, “and it will become clear that most of these mechanisms would impede rather than facilitate the world’s risk assessment and preparedness for an influenza pandemic.”Indonesian Health Minister Siti Fadilah Supari has asked the WHO for a binding guarantee that H5N1 samples won’t be used to develop commercial vaccines priced out of the country’s reach. Indonesia also signed a memorandum of understanding with US vaccine producer Baxter International that laid the groundwork for future collaborations or supply agreements.At the meeting today, Supari told reporters that if Indonesia had its own WHO collaborating center and vaccine factory, it would not need to send viruses outside the country, the Associated Press reported.The WHO said last week that projects to establish flu-vaccine manufacturing capacities in up to six developing countries—four in Asia and two in Latin America—were “in the final stage of approval.” Japan and the United States have provided $18 million toward the effort, the WHO said. But Heymann’s prepared speech did not mention those projects.US Health and Human Services Secretary Mike Leavitt said in a Mar 23 press release that the United States provided $10 million toward the WHO’s vaccine supply expansion plan. “Responding to a pandemic demands the cooperation of the world community, as no nation can go it alone. If a country is to protect its own people, it must work together with other nations to protect the people of the world,” he said.Heymann said solutions for improving H5N1 vaccine access in developing countries will require both short- and long-term measures, which could include:National stockpilesVirtual stockpiles—certain amounts of pandemic vaccine that producers would set aside for the WHO to buy for developing countriesFill-and-finish operations that allow developing countries to package bulk vaccine from manufacturersTechnology-transfer agreements like those used for the conjugate meningitis vaccine, which would allow developing countries to add to the world’s flu vaccine supply.See also:Mar 22 CIDRAP News story “WHO: Six developing countries may get flu vaccine plants”Mar 23 HHS press releasehttp://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2007pres/03/20070323e.htmllast_img read more

Shell lifts second Otakikpo cargo

first_imgLekoil has informed that its second export from the Otakikpo offshore field in Nigeria has been lifted.According to Lekoil, around 250,000 barrels of gross production have been lifted from the FSO Ailsa Craig by Shell Trading, a subsidiary of Shell.In an update on Monday, Lekoil said it was due to receive its share of the payment for this crude within the next month.“With regular liftings from Otakikpo underway, the Company does not intend to provide updates for each export. The company expects to provide export updates concurrent with the Company’s reporting dates going forward,” Lekoil said.Current production at Otakikpo is approximately 5,500 bopd. The company said it  continued to focus on ramping up to Phase One target production of 10,000 bopd.last_img

Minnesota Muslim Activist Defends His Faith Against Radicalism

first_imgFaithLifestyle Minnesota Muslim Activist Defends His Faith Against Radicalism by: – July 13, 2011 36 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! Share Sharecenter_img Tweet Abdirizak BihiAs part of the Washington Post’s “Under Suspicion” series’ examination of the lives of American Muslims since the Sept. 11 attacks, Eli Saslow has profiled Abdirizak Bihi, whose story is another example of just how complicated those lives and our perceptions of them can be.The Somali-American man is the founder, director and sole employee of a community-based counterterrorism program in Minneapolis. He has testified at the controversial Capitol Hill hearings on Muslim radicalization, and the FBI and the Justice Department rely on his help during investigations of terrorist threats.Meanwhile, he struggles to gain financial support from the politicians who endorse his efforts, and operates with little funding from an area where at least 25 young men, including his 17-year-old nephew, have disappeared to fight for the militant Somali group al-Shabab in the past three years.Many mosques, elected officials and even law enforcement agencies have hesitated to address the radicalization of a small percentage of U.S. Muslims, because the topic itself is so divisive. The focus on homegrown jihad is considered either the next front in the war on terrorism or an Islamophobic witch hunt sure to create more ill will.Bihi describes himself as an observant Muslim who prays daily and fasts during Ramadan. He said it is his responsibility to “save the religion I love from a very small number of extremists.”Officially, Bihi is the director of the Somali Education and Special Advocacy Center, but in truth he is the center, aided only by a Samsung cellphone and a donated desk in the offices of Mo’s Building Maintenance. His program is part of an emerging movement that Washington officials refer to as “CVE,” or “countering violent extremism.” The idea is simple: Inoculate young Muslims against the risks of radicalization by making them feel entrenched and happy in their communities. The execution is much more complex.The Root Sharelast_img read more