Will 49ers pursue Le’Veon Bell? Don’t count on it

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile device SANTA CLARA — This time last year, the 49ers won a bidding war to sign dual-threat running back Jerick McKinnon. A year later, the 49ers don’t figure to break the bank for another running back.Instead, the 49ers will exercise more patience rather than rush McKinnon back in spring drills, after he spent all last season recovering from knee reconstruction.So when free agency begins on March 13, don’t expect a …last_img

The 2018 Farm Bill, industrial hemp and what it means for Ohio

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Ellen Essman, Sr. Research Associate Ohio State University Agricultural and Resource Law ProgramHemp is one of the most talked-about provisions of the new Farm Bill. There’s plenty of excitement about the removal of federal restrictions on hemp production and the economic opportunities for growing hemp. But what exactly does the Farm Bill say about hemp? Can Ohioans now grow, use and sell hemp and hemp products? We dove into the 807 pages of the Farm Bill Conference Report to find answers to your questions about the new legal status of hemp and hemp cultivation. What is hemp?Before we go much further in this discussion, it’s important to understand that both hemp and marijuana are species of cannabis, but they have different properties. Of particular note is the fact that marijuana contains much more tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) than hemp. THC is the part of a cannabis plant that can cause a psychoactive effect in certain concentrations, but hemp plants generally do not contain enough THC to produce a “high.” Hemp has many uses — it can be used for construction materials, fabrics and clothing, and animal bedding. It has even been discussed as a potential cover crop. Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a very popular extract of the hemp plant that is alleged to help those with anxiety, pain, inflammation, and other ailments, but not much research has been done to verify its effectiveness for medical use. Note that CBD is also an extract of the higher THC marijuana plant. Hemp is removed from the federal list of controlled substances — but only if it meets certain requirementsFirst and foremost, the Farm Bill removes hemp from the federal list of controlled substances. Section 12619 of the bill removes hemp from the definition of marijuana, which is still an illegal drug under federal law. In the same section, the bill federally decriminalizes tetrahydrocannabinols (THC) in hemp. Not all hemp, however, is subject to this exemption. Only hemp and THC as defined in the Farm Bill and as grown under the conditions set forth in the Farm Bill are accorded the exemption.So, how does the Farm Bill change the definition of hemp? The main hemp provision of the bill, Section 10113, separates hemp from the definition of marijuana and redefines hemp as “the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of that plant, including the seeds thereof and all derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers, whether growing or not with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.” Coming soon: state and federal hemp production plansThe new law doesn’t allow a producer to start growing hemp today. Instead, Section 10113 of the Farm Bill describes the two situations under which a producer will be able to engage in legal hemp production in the future. In the first situation, the States or Indian tribes may take charge of the regulation of hemp production within their boundaries. To do this, a State must first submit a plan to the USDA through their state department of agriculture. A State plan must include:A way to keep track of land where hemp is produced within the state;Methods the state will use to test how much THC is in hemp plants;A way to dispose of plants or products that have a higher THC concentration than is legally allowed;A procedure for inspecting hemp producers;A plan for enforcing the law;A system for dissemination of a hemp producer’s information to the USDA; andAssurances that the state has the resources to carry out the plan.A producer who wants to cultivate hemp in a State that has an approved hemp production plan must first comply with the State’s plan before beginning to grow hemp. Predictions are that it may take a State about a year to create its hemp production plan and obtain the required USDA approval for the plan.The second situation for growing hemp comes into play if a State or Tribe does not submit a hemp plan to USDA. In this case, as long as the State has not limited the regulation or production of hemp under state law, the Secretary of Agriculture for the USDA may establish a plan “to monitor and regulate” hemp production within that State. A plan established by the USDA must meet the same criteria as a plan written by a State, and the law also requires the USDA to establish a licensing procedure for producers. Thus, a producer in a State that doesn’t have a hemp plan could legally grow hemp by obtaining a USDA hemp license through the hemp regulations that the USDA will develop, unless the State has prohibited hemp cultivation. Section 10113 specifically states that it does not preempt or limit any state law that “regulates the production of hemp” as well as any state law that is “more stringent” than federal law in regulating hemp production. Thus, a State can outlaw hemp production within its boundaries or include additional restrictions and requirements in its State plan as long as the plan complies with the federal law requirements. Handling producer violationsWhat if a hemp producer doesn’t comply with the new law or with the State or USDA hemp production plan? Section 10113 also describes how violations of the law will be handled. If a hemp producer negligently violates a State or USDA hemp production plan, the producer could be subject to enforcement. One negligent violation of the plan would not trigger criminal punishment, but the violator would have to comply with a corrective action plan prescribed by the State or USDA. However, if a producer negligently violates a plan three times in five years, the producer will be banned from producing hemp for five years. Examples of negligent violations in the law include: not providing a legal description of the land where hemp is produced, growing hemp without obtaining a license “or other required authorization” from the State, Tribe, or USDA, or producing hemp with a THC concentration higher than 0.3%. If a producer violates a State or USDA plan “with a culpable mental state greater than negligence” (that is, purposely, knowingly, or recklessly), then the State or USDA must report the violation to law enforcement authorities. Furthermore, persons convicted of a felony relating to a controlled substance under state or federal law are generally barred from hemp production for ten years following the date of their conviction, with the exception of persons convicted of a controlled substances felony but lawfully participating in a pilot program under the 2014 Farm Bill. Finally, if a person falsifies an application to participate in hemp production, that person will be totally barred from producing hemp. Legal hemp not to be prohibited in interstate commerceThe new law also allows for the interstate commerce of legally produced hemp and hemp products. Section 10114 says that a State or Indian Tribe cannot prevent the transportation or shipment of legally produced hemp through its state or territory. While a State may ban the sale of hemp or hemp products solely within its borders, it must allow hemp products to move freely through the State. For example, imagine that Pennsylvania allows hemp production but Ohio does not. Producers of legal hemp in Pennsylvania could not sell the hemp within Ohio, but Ohio could not prohibit a truck, train, or other type of transport from carrying the hemp through Ohio to a destination outside of Ohio. Hemp becomes eligible for crop insuranceImportantly, the Farm Bill also addresses hemp production risk by amending the Federal Crop Insurance Act to include hemp. Section 1119 adds hemp to the definition of “agricultural commodities” that can be insured and section 11106 adds legally produced hemp to the list of crops that can be insured even after harvested. Other provisions in Title XI waive marketability requirements for researching hemp. Making way for hemp research fundingSeveral provisions in the Farm Bill ensure that it is legally permissible to fund hemp research. Section 7129 amends the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act to allow the Secretary of Agriculture to award grants for researching hemp and the development of hemp products. In section 7501, the bill amends the Critical Agricultural Materials Act to allow research on hemp, meaning that Congress believes hemp has the “potential of producing critical materials for strategic and industrial purposes.”Finally, section 7605 amends the hemp pilot program language from the 2014 Farm Bill. The Secretary of Agriculture is tasked with conducting a study on the pilot program and submitting a report on the study to Congress within a year. Section 7605 also repeals the hemp pilot programs, but only one year after final regulation on hemp production under section 10113 is published. How does current Ohio law treat hemp production?Ohio law defines marijuana as “all parts of a plant of the genus cannabis…” in Ohio Revised Code section 3719.01. Hemp is in the genus cannabis, as discussed earlier in this post. Therefore, under current Ohio law, hemp is the same as marijuana. Marijuana is a controlled substance under Ohio law, and the law states that “[n]o person shall knowingly obtain, possess, or use a controlled substance.”What about hemp-derived CBD oil? Ohio enacted a medical marijuana law in 2016, although dispensaries in the state have yet to open (so far, only one dispensary in the state has been licensed). In order to obtain medical marijuana in Ohio, it would have to be prescribed by a physician with which the patient has a “bona fide physician-client relationship,” and the patient would have to have a qualifying medical condition. Medical marijuana can be prescribed and used in oil form under the law. Since Ohio law lumps hemp in with marijuana, this means that in order to obtain CBD oil derived from hemp, a person would also have to follow the steps to obtain medical marijuana. Hemp-derived CBD oil also does not fall under any exceptions in Ohio’s definition of marijuana. Ohio’s State Board of Pharmacy specifically stated in a guidance document that CBD oil can only be legally dispensed from a licensed dispensary. In releasing this guidance, the Board of Pharmacy is purporting to act under the rulemaking authority granted under ORC 3796.04.Note, however, that there are exceptions to Ohio’s definition of marijuana. According to Ohio law, marijuana “does not include the mature stalks of the plant, fiber produced from the stalks, oils or cake made from the seeds of the plant, or any other compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of the mature stalks, except the resin extracted from the mature stalks, fiber, oil or cake, or the sterilized seed of the plant that is incapable of germination.”Since hemp falls under the definition of marijuana, it is possible that some of these exceptions could also apply to certain hemp products made from stalks or seeds. Thus, it is plausible that some hemp products could be sold and used in Ohio. The law also states, however, that no person (other than those licensed under the medical marijuana law) “shall knowingly cultivate” marijuana. Again, since hemp is part of the state’s definition of marijuana, under the law, that means that nobody can “knowingly cultivate” hemp, either.In sum, it appears as though some excepted hemp products could be sold in Ohio, but not CBD oil, as it does not fall under the exception. Even if some hemp products can be sold in Ohio, hemp itself cannot currently be cultivated in Ohio. The new hemp language in the Farm Bill allows states to be more restrictive with hemp than the federal government, so Ohio can continue its ban on certain hemp products even with the new federal law. The State cannot, however, stop the transportation of hemp across the State, as explained above. Conversely, Ohio’s General Assembly could remove hemp from Ohio’s definition of marijuana and redefine hemp according to the Farm Bill’s new definition, which could allow for legal hemp cultivation under the Farm Bill. For the time being, growing hemp in Ohio is not legal, but that is subject to change.last_img read more

Firefox’s Ubiquity Starts Thinking for Itself

first_imgIt also appears that if you weren’t looking for the restaurant called “pasta,” you could use the other suggestions provided to perform the action you wanted instead. Maybe you wanted to “translate pasta,” or read about pasta on Wikipedia…those links are only clicks away, although they didn’t appear in the immediate results.If Ubiquity can now accept any word into its interface, this expands the possibilities for use far beyond that of the geekified tech set because it means that, in theory, you would never have to memorize any of those commands at all. You could simply use the suggestions feature. Of course, a lot of this depends on how well Ubiquity can actually figure out what you meant based on the responses returned from the web services it queries. We’ll obviously need to extensively test this feature before we can really determine that. Still, the potential is there. Other Updates: Standardized Commands & More LanguagesAssuming you do want to learn the commands, though, you’ll be glad to know that they’ve now standardized those verbs to make them easier to learn. There are no more commands with hyphens, like the ugly “add-to-calendar,” for example.For non-English speakers, the new language options will be a plus. In Ubiquity 0.5, commands will come localized in Danish, English, and Japanese. Other languages will be added in the future, but if you can’t wait, the introduction of a new parser localization tool will help you teach Ubiquity your language.A Better Browser? The innovations being delivered by Ubiquity are enough for this blogger to keep Firefox around – at least for now. Despite having made a nearly 100% switch to Google’s Chrome (it’s the speed!), news like this has me contemplating a switch back. Yet my Firefox install is currently weighed down with a number of can’t-live-without-em (until I did, in Chrome) extensions that seem to slow it down. Perhaps it’s time for a fresh install with only the one extension: Ubiquity. Because really, the way it’s shaping up, it may be the only one you need.  Ubiquity 0.5 can be downloaded directly from here. Image credit: command line tee – flickr user pixelfrenzy Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… sarah perez 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#Browsers#news#Product Reviews#web A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Ubiquity, the experimental Firefox add-on that lets you tell your browser what to do by typing in natural language commands, has just been updated to version 0.5. This preview release adds support for more languages, which is great news for non-English speakers dying to get their hands on this cutting-edge technology. What’s more fascinating about this update, however, is the new way that Ubiquity works to understand your input. Instead of being limited only to what it already knows, it can now reach out and query web services to help it figure out what your input means. Did our browser just get smarter?Ubiquity in the Past In the past, Ubiquity worked by letting you enter in specialized commands called “verbs” into its interface which is launched by hitting “Ctrl + Space” on your keyboard (or “Option + Space” if you’re on Mac). These verbs let you update, interact, and access various web services from Wikipedia to Twitter to YouTube and so much more. Some verbs are built into the extension, while other custom verbs can be added on as you choose. (For a big list of custom Ubiquity verbs, check out this post.) Using Ubiquity gives you a geeky high as you type in commands like “twitter [message]” or “g [Search term]” to update your Twitter status or perform a Google search, respectively. However, interacting with the browser in this way probably appeals more to techies who probably still prefer the command line over that new-fangled GUI interface and have every keyboard shortcut memorized. It’s harder to imagine mainstream users (yep, those same ones who don’t even know what a browser is) using a UI such as this. But with the recent update, that may change. It’s Not About Knowing Everything, It’s About Knowing Where to LookAs people, we know we don’t have all the answers, but that never holds us back. We launch Google, enter our question, and parse through the results provided until we find what we need. But ask an application to do something that it hasn’t been programmed to understand, and it will just give you a blank look. (OK, probably an error message, but you get the idea).That’s why what Ubiquity is doing is so interesting. It can now accept and process input, even if it doesn’t know the word. Maybe it’s not really “thinking” as the title of this post implies – it’s not all of a sudden an A.I. engine or anything – but it has just made a giant leap. For example, explains Jono DiCarlo on behalf of the Ubiquity team, the software can now make network calls to help it figure out what you meant when you entered a word. “You can now type ‘pasta’ into Ubquity,” he says. “Before, it wouldn’t have known what to do with this input. But now, by making network calls to web services, it recognizes ‘pasta’ as a type of restaurant, and suggests the Yelp command to find pasta places near you.” Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostinglast_img read more