Ohio State football more than all right with JT Barrett at quarterback

OSU redshirt-freshman quarterback J.T. Barrett scans the field during practice at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center Aug. 9.Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorWhen a team loses its senior Heisman-candidate quarterback, it can typically expect to see a big drop off in its offensive strength.If you ask Ohio State redshirt-junior tight end Nick Vannett, though, he’ll tell you that won’t necessarily be the case as redshirt-freshman quarterback J.T. Barrett takes the place of the injured Braxton Miller.“I think with the way they (Barrett and redshirt-sophomore quarterback Cardale Jones) have been playing right now, I don’t think we’ll skip a beat,” Vannett said Monday after practice. “I think we’ll be just fine.”While Barrett has yet to take a snap outside of practice for the Scarlet and Gray, he and Jones have been practicing with the first-team offense since the spring. Miller initially injured his shoulder against Clemson in the Orange Bowl to end last season, paving the way for Barrett and Jones to get the only significant reps at quarterback in spring practice.Miller was limited again this fall because his shoulder was sore after an offseason surgery. And then he tore his throwing shoulder labrum in practice Aug. 18.Vannett said practice time will help the offense continue on the same beat going forward, even though the team initially expected Miller to make a full recovery from the first injury.“We did a really (good) job with our quarterbacks, 0having J.T. and Cardale getting reps in the spring as well with (Miller) out,” he said. “It’s not like it’s a last minute thing where we’re just jumping in and kind of rushing stuff.”Senior wide receiver Evan Spencer said there will be changes to the offense, but agreed that Barrett, as well as Jones if he plays any reps, will be ready to go because of the amount of practice time they’ve had since the season ended.“They’ve been throwing the ball so much all throughout camp, and really all throughout the offseason, that it’s not that much of a transition for us just because that’s what we’ve been going through,” Spencer said.While many wrote off OSU as a contender in the National Championship race after Miller went down, Spencer said he’s seen enough in practice to have plenty of confidence heading into the season.“Personally, I think what we’ve been seeing out at practice — and a lot of the other seniors can back me up — is … we’ll be way more than all right this year,” he said. “That’s for sure.”OSU coach Urban Meyer said he believes Barrett and Jones have been up to the challenge since Miller was injured, and the changes at the position will be helped along by a plethora of talented receivers.“J.T. and Cardale responded very well (after Miller’s injury),” Meyer said at a Monday press conference. “The biggest issue I see, or the positive we have right now, is we have a good one and two group of receivers that are just rotating out.”Meyer said there will be six different receivers rotating through the lineup, with the plan being to give Barrett the freshest and most rested targets possible throughout OSU’s season opener.Then-redshirt-freshman quarterback Cardale Jones (12) avoids a defender during a game against Florida A&M Sept. 21 at Ohio Stadium. OSU won, 76-0.Lantern file photoEven though Meyer announced Barrett as the No. 2 quarterback before Miller went down with his injury, he said there isn’t a big gap between his and Jones’ talent. The third-year OSU coach confirmed, though, that Barrett is the starter heading into the season.Meyer also said it would be possible for Jones to come in for Barrett if the latter doesn’t perform up to expectations in the first weeks of the season.Regardless of his performance on the field, Spencer said the team has confidence in Barrett as a leader, which is a role he has taken on since Miller’s injury.“You could kind of tell from the beginning of camp that (Barrett) was trying to work on his maturity and his leadership as a young player,” Spencer said. “But after Braxton went down in practice, I think he kind of realized pretty quickly, ‘All right, well, time to take a leadership role.’”Spencer said as soon as the team realized Miller would be out, Barrett stepped up to the challenge of filling those shoes.“In the huddle from then on, when (Barrett) was in practice and doing stuff like that he was just making sure that he was keeping people going,” Spencer said. “If we were having a rough day, he was making sure that we’d stay up, that we’d stay motivated.”Meyer said one of the first things he noticed about Barrett was his competitive spirit. He said Barrett isn’t any louder as a leader than Miller, but added the’s “very confident.”Spencer said Miller and Barrett have different leadership qualities, but said both are good at what they do. He added Barrett is a strong motivator and he’s excited to see what happens going forward.OSU’s first game of the season is scheduled for Saturday against Navy at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. Kickoff is set for noon. read more

How AI Is Addressing the Fraud in Advertising Heres What You Need

first_img Given the online advertising boom in today’s digital age, businesses need to learn to allocate their marketing dollars wisely. Unfortunately, there’s a big challenge to meeting that goal: Advertising fraud and lackluster results are rife in the digital ad space.Related: Telltale Signs You Have an Ad Fraud ProblemAs a business owner, digital manager and entrepreneur, you’ve likely already experienced these issues, via paid Instagram ads that failed to achieve their intended results, or paid services like Google Adwords that had no conversions. To avoid such outcomes, you need to make sure your ads stand out and that you’re spending your dollars on actual results — not bot traffic.To clarify my Instagram example: Let’s say that you paid Instagram to promote your post, and, all of a sudden, you start gaining a bunch of followers who, according to their account information, live in India and have only about five pictures each on their individual profiles.I’m no ad-fraud detective, but judging from the looks of that kind of new traffic, you’d be wise to question these followers’ validity. While Instagram gains a benefit by earning your ad money, you need clicks from people likely to buy your product — not “followers” from some faraway land with profiles that appear fake.Those people won’t benefit you as a business owner. This is why you need to make sure you’re on top of your ads, because they’re big money these days: Nearly $170 billion was spent on digital advertising in 2015, according to the statistic portal Statista. By 2021, Statistic has predicted, this figure can will rise to more than $330 billion.The problem is, digital advertising is a constantly changing game. And organizations are struggling to respond effectively. To adapt to the many changes happening, many companies are planning to increase their investments in advertising technology. They’ll be focusing on solutions that are more result-driven and customer-centric. Here’s what you need to know:What artificial intelligence can do.Part of the newest wave of advertising tech utilizes artificial intelligence (AI). Advertisers are focusing their efforts on AI to provide potential customers with a personalized experience tailored to their wants and needs. AI can help advertisers avoid pushing irrelevant messaging and instead use consumer data to create customized campaigns that are relevant and engaging.Related: You Should Be Protecting Your Business from Phony LeadsThat’s all very well. But, as Jon Gillham, founder and CEO of Adbank, recently told Crypto Analyst, “Over 50 percent of online traffic are bots.”An unknown percentage of digital advertising dollars are wasted on fraudulent traffic and sites,” continued Gillham , whose online advertising platform has developed patent-pending blockchain technology for fraud detection.Specifically, more and more advertising companies are inflating their results with ad clicks from computer-based bots, instead of real potential consumers. These companies use bot traffic to exaggerate their data and inflate prices for customers. Similarly, many websites use those bots and inflate their traffic figures to entice potential advertisers to place ads with them.That’s the website situation. Mobile advertising fraud, meanwhile, has also become commonplace, so much so that many companies expect a certain level of it, according to a new report by Forrester Consulting. Forrester surveyed 250 marketers whose companies spend at least $1 million a month on digital advertising. And, the result, Forrester reported, was that 69 percent of the marketers said that at least 20 percent of their budgets was being eaten up by fraud on the mobile web.In other words, 20 percent of their budgets was being wasted on fake traffic. Despite this problematic landscape, 70 percent of the marketers in the survey said they were actually increasing their budgets for mobile advertising over the next 12 months. That’s a problem because, as 43 percent of the marketers said, the amount of fraud they had been subjected to had increased over the previous 12 months.At the same time, only 19 percent as of the date of the survey had implemented systematic fraud prevention programs, and that figure was expected to increase in 2018.So, the overriding question was whether these prevention programs would be enough: Fully 92 percent of the marketers reported that combating mobile fraud would be a high or critical priority of their companies for the next 12 months, in 2018. The problem is, ad fraud is only worsening. Forrester wasn’t alone in its doom-and-gloom forecast. A recent report from the digital market research firm Juniper, predicted that advertisers would lose an estimated $19 billion to fraudulent activities in 2018. The Juniper report, Future Digital Advertising — AI, Ad Fraud & Ad Blocking, 2017-2022, said that that $19 billion worked out to $51 million per day and  could  be expected to rise, reaching $44 billion by 2022.The report also specified that advertising fraud would increase due to the lack of transparency between advertisers and publishers. The big problem, Juniper said, is that publishers aren’t providing campaign result reports, due to the fact that they don’t possess the right tools for these reports. Without more transparency, Juniper warned, successfully tackling fraud will be difficult to accomplish.Still, there are solutions.Despite the gloomy nature of its report, Juniper did identify some solutions to ad fraud — like AI. By using AI to analyze data generated from advertising activities, Juniper said, advertisers could minimize financial losses. Of course, that in turn would demand innovation and the development of new strategies to fight fraudsters, simply because they’ll just adapt their methods and find different ways to imitate genuine advertising activity. This activity, typically carried out by bots, includes simulated clicks, mouse movements and the creation of fake social network accounts that engage (via likes and comments.).Juniper’s research indicated that platforms utilizing AI to target specific markets would account for 74 percent of total online and mobile advertising expenditures by 2022. With AI-powered technology and innovations now focusing in on advertising fraud, some studies predict that that fraud may become less rampant in coming years. According to a report on ZDNet from the security company White Ops, companies lost $6.5 billion due to ad fraud in 2017. That’s a decrease of 10 percent from the estimated $7.2 billion fraud took from companies in 2016.These results are probably due to the increased awareness about deceptive advertising practices and the efforts companies are taking to address them, using AI and other technological advancements. With increased information, companies will know where and how their advertising dollars are being spent and be more likely to attain the results they want.Related: 4 Ways Advertising Agencies Can Protect Themselves From Click FraudThen, hopefully, your company will gain new Instagram followers from Milwaukee, versus Mumbai.  6 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. March 13, 2018 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Register Now »last_img read more

Bill funds school partnership program in N Michigan classrooms

first_img04Oct Bill funds school partnership program in N. Michigan classrooms Rep. Allor applauds inclusion in budget add-on Categories: Allor News,Newscenter_img State Rep. Sue Allor today said funding for a program that aims to cut down on school absenteeism and improve students’ grades in key areas was included in a bill approved by the House Appropriations Committee.Allor, of Wolverine, said $75,000 was included in a Senate bill before the committee that will fund the School Success Partnership Program administered by the Northeast Michigan Community Service Agency in Alpena (NEMCSA).The program’s focus is to increase school attendance and decrease chronic absenteeism, while identifying barriers to attendance and classroom success and connecting families to resources that can help them. It also works to improve academic performance, with emphasis on math and reading. Increasing parental involvement in students’ education is also addressed.“I am proud to see these dollars coming back to Northern Michigan, where they will help families facing many unique challenges.” said Allor, who serves on the Appropriations Committee. “The funding will go a long way in keeping kids in school and helping their parents stay involved in the educational process.”The measure, Senate Bill 253, now goes to the full House for consideration.#####last_img read more

Today is the final day for the big traders to be o

first_imgToday is the final day for the big traders to be out of the May futures contract in silver. The gold price didn’t do much of anything in Far East trading—and was back to Friday’s close in New York by the London open on Monday morning.  It popped for a couple of bucks at that point before trading virtually rule flat into the noon London silver fix.  Then it rose another couple of bucks before inching higher into the London p.m. gold fix.  The price blasted higher, but it was obvious that JPMorgan et al were at battle stations, as volume exploded—and the price wasn’t allowed to get far.  The rally finally petered out around 12:45 p.m. EDT.  From there it inched lower for the remainder of the New York trading session, both COMEX and electronic. The low and high ticks were recorded as $1,177.60 and $1,206.70 in the June contract. Gold finished the Monday session in New York at $1,201.70 spot, up $21.30 from Friday’s close.  Net volume was monstrous at 185,000 contracts, as “da boyz” threw everything but the kitchen sink at the rally once the price broke above its 50-day moving average. The CME Daily Delivery Report showed that 403 gold and 72 silver contracts were posted for delivery within the COMEX-approved depositories on Wednesday.  In gold, the largest short/issuer was JPMorgan out of its client account with 372 contracts.  HSBC USA was in very distant second with 31 contracts.  Not surprisingly, the tallest hog at the trough as a long/stopper was JPMorgan out of its in-house [proprietary] trading account with 211 contracts—and Canada’s Scotiabank was on the receiving end of 186 contracts. In silver, all 72 contracts were issued by JPMorgan out of its client account—and Canada’s Scotiabank stopped 70 of them.  The CME Group stopped one contract, so it could deliver five contracts into it’s 1,000 troy ounce mini-silver contract.  The link to yesterday’s Issuers and Stoppers Report is here. The CME Preliminary Report for the Monday trading session showed that the remaining gold open interest for April fell by 26 contracts, down to 415 contracts.  With 403 contracts already posted for delivery tomorrow, it will be interesting to see if the 12 contracts remaining will get delivered on Thursday, or will they simply disappear.  In silver, the April open interest jumped by 50 contracts to 72 contracts and, obviously, they are all out for delivery tomorrow. I can hardly wait to see who the big short/issuers and long/stoppers are in the May delivery month—and we’ll find some of that out on Thursday evening, as it’s First Notice Day. There was a big gold withdrawal from GLD by an authorized participant on Monday.  This time it was 105,527 troy ounces.  And as of 8:50 p.m. EDT yesterday evening, there were no reported changes in SLV.  But when I checked the iShares.com Internet site about 3:45 a.m. EDT, I saw that an authorized participant had added 1,434,162 troy ounces.  Based on the price action, it’s a reasonable assumption that this was used to cover an existing short position, just like the 1 million ounce add to SLV on Friday. There was a small amount of gold sold at the U.S. Mint on Monday—4,000 troy ounces of gold eagles—and 500 one-ounce 24K gold buffaloes. The in/out activity in gold at the COMEX-approved depositories on Friday are barely worth mentioning, as 700 troy ounces were shipped in—and 132 troy ounces were shipped out.  Nothing to see here. There was decent in/out activity in silver, as 259,426 troy ounces were shipped in—and 259,426 ounces were shipped out the door.  None of it involved JPMorgan.  The link to that activity is here. For a change, there wasn’t any in/out activity at all in the gold kilobar warehouses in Hong Kong on Friday. Despite my best efforts, I have a large number of stories today—and I’ll happily leave the final edit up to you. Not one ounce of the 59 million equivalent ounces sold by the speculators in the managed money category this [past reporting] week was remotely connected to legitimate hedging; yet the sale was the indisputable sole price influence. That silver prices only declined by around 30 cents in the reporting week proves that the commercial buyers were more interested in buying the 59 million ounces from the managed money traders than they were in driving prices even lower. What this proves is that silver prices are being set on the COMEX with no regard to the actual world of silver production or consumption. The managed money long side is down to less than 42,500 contracts and is undoubtedly less than that since the cut-off and near the 40,000 contract non-technical fund core long position I have long postulated. Unless I’m off by a country mile (always possible), significant additional managed money long liquidation is not likely. The short position of the technical funds, at 32,283 contracts in the current report is already larger than the peak in January and higher, admittedly, than I thought it would be at this point. And it must be higher still since the cutoff. Simply put, the rocket fuel tanks appear to have been topped off in silver. – Silver analyst Ted Butler: 25 April 2015 There was no precious metal news to speak of on Monday—and the fact that prices blew up at the London p.m. gold fix [just like they melted down on Friday at that time] should be proof positive that this was all paper trading on the COMEX/GLOBEX between the brain-dead technical funds in the Managed Money category on one side—and the Commercial traders on the other. I was surprised that silver’s net volume was as low as it was, but I’m sure that  a certain portion of it was used to put out the fire in silver—and that was very noticeable in gold, with a huge blow-out in volume when gold broke above its 50-day moving average.  Silver just broke above its by only a few pennies. Here are the 6-month charts for all four precious metals courtesy of stockcharts.com. Silver traded quietly either side of $15.80 spot all through Far East and London trading, but starting shortly after 9 a.m. EDT things changed.  The first bump up in price took it up to $16 spot—and then it had two more quick rallies, one at the gold fix—and the other at 10:45 EDT just before London closed.  The high tick of the day came a minute before the London close—and the price didn’t do much after that. The low and high ticks were recorded by the CME Group as $15.68 and $16.445 in the May contract. Silver finished the Monday session at $16.40 spot, up 64.5 cents cents from Friday’s close.  Net volume was well in excess of 100,000 contracts, but it all netted out to only 28,000 contracts, so it didn’t appear that there was much interference in the silver rallies—and had all the hallmarks of short covering. Platinum chopped around unchanged until it hit its spike low shortly before 11 a.m. in Zurich.  Then it rallied a bit into the London p.m. gold fix—and away it went to the upside as well.  The high came at 1 p.m. EDT in New York—and from there it got sold off a bit into the close.  Platinum finished the day at $1,146 spot, up 23 dollars from Friday. The dollar index closed late on Friday afternoon in New York at 96.90—and rallied unsteadily in Far East and morning trading in London, hitting its 97.27 high tick shortly before the COMEX open in New York.  From there it got sold down to its 96.48 low tick about 12:45 p.m. EDT.  The index rallied back to 96.80 by 2 p.m.—and then chopped sideways in a tight range into the close.  The index finished the day at 96.86—down only 4 basis points from Friday. Once again the price activity in the currencies—and in the precious metal market—weren’t even close to being related. Freegold Ventures Limited is a North American gold exploration company with three gold projects in Alaska. Current projects include Golden Summit, Vinasale and Rob. Both Vinasale and Golden Summit host NI 43-101 Compliant Resource Calculations. An updated NI 43-101 resource was calculated on Golden Summit in October 2012 and using 0.3 g/t cutoff  the current resource is 73,580,000 tonnes grading 0.67 g/t Au for total of 1,576,000 contained ounces in the indicated category, and 223,300,000 tonnes grading 0.62 g/t Au for a total of 4,437,000 contained ounces in the inferred category. In addition to the Golden Summit Project the Vinasale also hosts a NI 43-101 resource calculation which was updated in March 2013. Indicated resources are 3.41 million tonnes averaging 1.48 g/t Au for 162,000 ounces, and Inferred resources are 53.25 million tonnes averaging 1.05 g/t Au for 1,799,000 ounces of gold utilizing a cutoff value of 0.5 grams/tonne (g/t) as a possible open pit cutoff. Please send us an email for more information, [email protected] I was out with my camera again on Sunday.  It’s spring, but this far north in continental North America, it arrives slowly.  A lot of the waterfowl and a few other species of birds have returned from the south, but the rest are weeks away from showing up. The first photo is of a jackrabbit—and it’s not quite in focus as the auto focus couldn’t keep up with him.  They’re very common around here—and this one looks a little shaggy, as it’s in the final throes of losing its inner and outer winter coat.  This is not your cute little bunny, this is a big animal—and there are only a few dogs it can’t outrun. The silver equities turned in a better performance—and their highs came about the same time as gold’s, but they didn’t sell off as much after that, as Nick Laird’s Intraday Silver Sentiment Index closed up 4.18 percent.center_img Here’s your typical drake mallard in its breeding plumage.  I was using a 1.4x teleconverter with my 400mm telephoto lens when I took this shot, so the image quality is not quite what it could be.  The photo below it is of a drake mallard as well, as it flew overhead.  It’s a view very few get to see for any length of time—but at 1/3,200 of a second, the wing action gets stopped cold—and you can view the wing pattern at your leisure. The gold stocks gapped up a bit at the open—and barely reacted to the big jump in price at the London p.m. fix.  However they did continue to rally steadily from there, hitting their zenith minutes before 1 p.m. EDT, which was gold’s high tick on the day.  From there they slid lower for the remainder of the Monday trading session, giving back over half their gains, as the HUI only closed up 1.90 percent.  I was underwhelmed. Here’s the 5-minute tick gold chart courtesy of Brad Robertson.  All the volume that mattered on Monday came between the London pm. gold fix and the COMEX close, which was 10 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. EDT—08:00 till 11:30 on this chart, which is scaled for Denver time.  Add two hours for EDT—and don’t forget the ‘click to enlarge’ feature. Palladium rallied as well, but on a slightly different time schedule from the other three precious metals.  The low came about the same time as platinum, but the high came shortly after it’s rally at the London p.m. gold fix.  From there, like platinum, it got sold down into the the close of electronic trading.  Palladium only finished up 8 bucks on the day. And as I write this paragraph, the London open is fifteen minutes away.  All four precious metals got sold down a bit during the first couple of hours of Far East trading on their Tuesday morning—and have all traded pretty much ruler flat since then.  Gold is hanging onto the $1,200 spot mark by its proverbial fingernails at the moment. Gold volume is a bit over 16,500 contracts, with virtually all of it in the current front month, which is June, so it’s all of the HFT variety.  Silver volume is very decent, but once you remove the roll-overs, net volume is barely moving the needle at 1,500 contracts.  It’s like yesterday’s price action never happened. The dollar index has been chopping sideways as well—and is currently down 8 basis points. Today is the final day for the big traders to be out of the May futures contract in silver, so I expect Tuesday’s volume to be pretty chunky as well, with a tiny net volume.  Of course that may all go out the window if we have another price surprise in COMEX trading this morning, but I don’t ever remember big price moments on this particular day of the trading month—but after yesterday, I guess one shouldn’t rule it out entirely.  But if I had to bet money, it would be on the former scenario. Today, at the close of COMEX trading, is also the cut-off for this Friday’s Commitment of Traders Report—and it will be interesting to see if all of the reporting week’s price/volume action makes it into that report, particularly Monday’s action.  We’ll see. And as I send today’s column off to Stowe, Vermont at 5:15 a.m. EDT, I see that all four precious metals are still down a hair from Monday’s close—and with the exception of palladium, all are trading absolutely flat.  Gold’s net volume is way up there at 27,000 contracts, with 99 percent of that in current front month. As expected, there’s still heavy roll-over volume in silver, but net volume is still extremely light at barely over 2,100 contracts—and the dollar index is virtually unchanged from two and half hours ago, down 5 basis points. I haven’t the foggiest notion as to how the precious metals will trade for the remainder of the Tuesday session, but I will be surprised if we do see a lot of price action either today or tomorrow, as the May silver contract goes off the board. That’s all I have for today—and I’ll see you here tomorrow.last_img read more

Oil shouldnt be rallying This month the price

first_imgOil shouldn’t be rallying. This month, the price of oil has jumped 12%. Yesterday, it closed at its highest price since early July. While this is a big move, it’s not uncommon for commodities. Remember, commodities are volatile. One day, they’re soaring. The next, they’re crashing. It’s important not to get caught up in their day-to-day swings. Still, this rally caught our eye… You may remember that oil crashed in the summer of 2014. It’s since plunged 75%. In January, it hit its lowest level since 2003. Oil tanked because there was simply too much of it. High prices and innovative techniques like “fracking” triggered a huge boom in global oil production. Over the last decade, U.S. output nearly doubled to the highest level since the 1970s. Production in other major oil-producing countries hit record highs. The global economy ended up with more oil than it needed. For the past two years, the global economy has been working through a giant oil surplus. Progress has been slow. According to International Energy Agency (IEA), the global economy is still oversupplied by more than 300,000 barrels per day (bpd). Yet, oil’s rallying. Today, we’ll show you what’s pushing oil higher. As you’ll see, it won’t cure the industry’s biggest problems… • Hopes of a production “freeze” caused oil prices to surge… Earlier this month, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), a cartel of 14 oil-producing countries, said it plans to hold informal talks in Algeria next month. The purpose of this meeting is to bring stability back to the oil market. Some analysts think OPEC could even freeze production at this meeting, meaning it would cap production at current levels. We aren’t holding our breath… • OPEC has already tried to cap output a couple times over the past year… The most recent talk took place in Qatar in April. OPEC even invited non-members like Russia. It was the first time in 15 years OPEC met non-members to discuss fixing output. Oil rallied ahead of the meeting on hopes that OPEC would reach an agreement. The talks went nowhere. Iran, OPEC’s second-biggest producer, didn’t even show up. • OPEC isn’t acting like a cartel… Right now, it’s every member for itself. And it’s not hard to see why… Oil is the economic backbone of every OPEC nation. It makes up 80% of Saudi Arabia’s exports…66% of Kuwait’s exports…and 46% of the United Arab Emirates’ exports. If these countries stop producing oil, their economies could fall apart. Last month, Saudi Arabia pumped a record 10.67 million bpd, which broke the monthly record set last June. The United Arab Emirates and Kuwait are also producing record amounts of oil. If OPEC was serious about “stabilizing” the market, it wouldn’t keep flooding the world with oil. • Even if OPEC agrees to freeze production, it won’t make much difference… As we’ve said many times, the world needs oil companies to cut production, not cap it at record highs. It’s true that production in some parts of world, including the U.S., has come down. But more cuts are needed. According to the IEA, “the massive overhang of stocks is also keeping a lid on prices, with both newly produced and stored crude competing for market share.” A huge surplus isn’t the only factor keeping oil prices low either. • The global economy is slowing… A few weeks ago, we told you oil demand was plummeting. According to the global investment bank Barclays (BCS), oil demand is growing about one-third as fast as it did a year ago. Oil is the most important commodity on the planet. It literally powers the global economy. If demand for oil is weak, it’s because the global economy is headed in the wrong direction. According to Forbes, China’s economy, which is growing at the slowest pace since 1990, is weighing on oil. The economies of Japan and South Korea, two major oil importers, are also showing signs of fatigue. Meanwhile, U.S. gasoline demand is weak. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. gasoline stockpiles hit their highest seasonal level since 1990 last month. Gasoline, a byproduct of oil, keeps our cars running. If folks are buying less of it, it’s because they’re driving less. That’s not a good sign for the economy. And it’s bad news for oil prices. • Oil companies have two big problems right now… The world still has too much oil. And households and businesses are consuming less oil. This tells us oil prices could stay low for a long time. Some folks might read that and think they should avoid all oil stocks. But Casey readers know one of the best ways to make huge gains investing is to buy beaten-down markets. That’s because crisis investing, as we like to call it, often allows you to buy world-class businesses for dirt-cheap prices.  • For the past two years, the oil market has been a bloodbath… Major oil companies like Chevron (CVX) and Exxon (XOM) have lost billions of dollars due to low oil prices. More than a hundred smaller oil companies have gone out of business. But, remember, the oil market is cyclical. It experiences big booms and busts. And since the world isn’t about to stop using oil, oil stocks will boom again. During the 2009–2014 boom, the average U.S. oil producer gained 256%. Right now, many oil stocks are trading at deep discounts. The SPDR S&P Oil & Gas Exploration & Production ETF (XOP), which tracks major U.S. oil producers, is trading 56% below its 2014 high. • If you want to get back into oil stocks, stick with the best… Oil prices could stay low for years. So make sure you only invest in companies that can make money at low prices. We also like companies with quality assets, healthy profit margins, and little to no debt. In other words, we want companies that can “weather the storm” if oil prices fall again. In March, Nick Giambruno, editor of Crisis Investing, recommended a company that checks all these boxes. According to Nick, this company can make money at as low as $35 oil. Nick’s oil pick has returned 19% since March. But it’s not too late to invest in this elite business. The stock is trading 23% below its 2014 high. Recommended Link Recommended Link • You can learn more about this world-class oil company by signing up for Crisis Investing… To get started, watch this new presentation. It explains how to access Nick’s top investing ideas today. It also talks about the biggest crisis investing opportunity you’ll ever come across. As you’ll see, it’s only a matter of time before this crisis hits. When this crisis makes landfall, it could put millions of Americans out of work. Even more people could see their life savings disappear. This short video explains how to “flip” this crisis into an opportunity to make huge gains. If you stick to our plan, you could be part of a new class of millionaires that emerges from this crisis. The best part is that you don’t even have to do anything exotic, like trade options. All you have to do is make simple investments at the right time. This FREE video explains exactly how to do this. Chart of the Day The retail sector just flashed another warning sign. Today’s chart shows the performance of retail giant Target (TGT) since the start of August. You can see Target’s stock plunged 6.3% today. It’s headed for its second-worst day in five years. Target’s stock nosedived after it reported a 10% decline in second-quarter profits. Management blamed the bad results on a “difficult retail environment.” It doesn’t expect business to pick up anytime soon. This morning, management said this year’s sales and profits would likely come in lower than expected. Target isn’t the only major retailer bracing for tough times. Last week, Kohl’s (KSS) lowered its profit outlook for the year. And Macy’s (M) recently announced plans to shut down 14% of its stores by the end of the year. This tells us something is very wrong with the economy…and that more trouble could be ahead. You see, consumer spending makes up 70% of the U.S. economy. When the economy slows, folks will stop buying designer jeans and expensive cologne to make sure they don’t miss a mortgage payment. They’ll hold off on buying a new watch to save money for the essentials. Today, Target and many other big American retailers are trading like we’re in a recession. To learn the best way to protect your wealth—no matter what happens to the economy—click here. —last_img read more

Olympic video and VR Guide to watching without a TV

This 2018 image provided by Comcast Corp. shows Xfinity Stream mobile app with Olympics coverage for Comcast customers. NBC owner Comcast will include online coverage on its TV set-top boxes and TV coverage on its mobile apps to offer viewers one-stop shop to the Olympics. Comcast and other cable providers will also offer the opening ceremony and other events in sharper, “4K” resolution, though with a day’s delay. (Comcast Corp. via AP) Every Olympic event will be streamed live. But to watch online, you’ll still need to be a paying cable or satellite subscriber. As with past Olympics, NBC is requiring proof of a subscription. If you’ve already given up on traditional cable or satellite TV, you can sign up for an online TV service such as PlayStation Vue or YouTube TV. Otherwise, your video will cut out after a half-hour grace period.The subscription requirement also applies to coverage on virtual-reality headsets.More than 1,800 hours of online coverage begins Wednesday evening in the U.S. with preliminary curling matches. Friday’s opening ceremony will be shown live online starting at 6 a.m. ET, and on NBC’s prime-time broadcast on a delayed basis at 8 p.m. NBC also plans live streaming of the closing ceremony on Feb. 25.Here’s a guide to watching the Olympics online.___TRADITIONAL COVERAGENBC’s over-the-air network will cover popular sports such as figure skating and skiing, some of it live. For those who can’t get to a TV, NBC will stream the broadcast at NBCOlympics.com and the NBC Sports app. But there you’ll need your paid-TV credentials to sign in—even though you can watch the network over the air for free. The sports network NBCSN will be the main overflow channel, carrying events such as biathlon, bobsled and luge. Coverage on CNBC and USA Network will be limited to curling and ice hockey. The Olympic Channel will have medal ceremonies, news and highlights, but not event coverage. All four of these cable channels will also be streamed online.Much of the online coverage will come from the International Olympic Committee’s Olympic Broadcasting Services. That means the spotlight will be on all athletes, not just Americans. In addition to live events, you can get streams of some training and practice runs. NBC also plans digital-only shows, including a daily two-hour wrap-up starting at noon ET (2 a.m. the next morning in Pyeongchang).Some cable companies plan special features. NBC owner Comcast will include online coverage on its TV set-top boxes and TV coverage on its mobile apps to offer viewers one-stop access to the Olympics. Comcast and other cable providers will also offer the opening ceremony and other events in sharper “4K” resolution, though with a day’s delay. — PlayStation Vue, Sling TV and FuboTV are all $45 for comparable packages. But you can bring Sling TV’s bill down to $30 for just the two main Olympic channels and DVR. PlayStation is $40 without the Olympic Channel.Free trials are available, and you can cancel after the Olympics. Most services let you enter your ZIP code to check whether the NBC station is available. Streaming might be restricted where the station isn’t available.___BEYOND VIDEOThe NBC Sports app and the NBCOlympics website offer highlights, interviews and features on athletes without needing a subscription. You’ll also have full access to scores, schedules and guides to understanding obscure events.Samsung, an Olympic sponsor, developed the official Apple and Android app for the games, called PyeongChang 2018. It has schedules, news and 3-D and drone views of the venues.The games’ official website, pyeongchang2018.com, also has live video of the Olympic torch relay.Traditional media organizations will also cover the event, even though extensive video from the official venues are restricted to the rights-holding broadcasters. The Associated Press, for instance, has a Winter Games hub with traditional text, photo and video coverage alongside graphics breaking down complicated moves in figure skating and snowboarding and daily illustrations from sketch artist Dan Archer. The AP will also have 360-degree video and drone views of the venues. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In this Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, file photo, athletes from Japan practice at the Gangneung Oval during a speed skating training session prior to the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea. As with past Olympics, NBC is requiring proof of a TV subscription to watch. More than 1,800 hours of online coverage begins Wednesday, Feb. 7, in the U.S. with preliminary curling matches. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File) Explore further This 2018 image provided by Comcast Corp. shows the Olympics interface on an X1 TV set-top box for Comcast customers. NBC owner Comcast will include online coverage on its TV set-top boxes and TV coverage on its mobile apps to offer viewers one-stop shop to the Olympics. Comcast and other cable providers will also offer the opening ceremony and other events in sharper, “4K” resolution, though with a day’s delay. (Comcast Corp. via AP) © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This 2018 image provided by Comcast Corp. shows the Olympics interface on an X1 TV set-top box for Comcast customers. NBC owner Comcast will include online coverage on its TV set-top boxes and TV coverage on its mobile apps to offer viewers one-stop shop to the Olympics. Comcast and other cable providers will also offer the opening ceremony and other events in sharper, “4K” resolution, though with a day’s delay. (Comcast Corp. via AP) Olympic video and VR: Guide to watching without a TV ___VIRTUAL REALITYIntel is working with the Olympic Broadcasting Services to produce virtual-reality coverage of 30 events. Eighteen events, or 55 hours, will be live.During the Rio Olympics in 2016, VR coverage typically wasn’t live and required Samsung’s Gear VR headsets with a Samsung phone. This time, VR is available on Google Daydream and Microsoft Mixed Reality headsets as well. Those without a headset can still watch on web browsers or Apple and Android mobile devices. In the U.S., you’ll need the NBC Sports VR app.VR isn’t meant to replace television. While Intel’s VR productions of baseball and other sports had their own announcers, the Olympic coverage will rely on regular television coverage embedded in the VR experience. And most of the VR video will be in 180 degrees—you’ll see the action in front of you and a little bit to the sides, but not what’s behind you. Videos in 360 degrees will be limited to non-competition features such as a demo run down the bobsled. Citation: Olympic video and VR: Guide to watching without a TV (2018, February 6) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-olympic-video-vr-tv.html But VR will offer more leaderboards and stats than television, along with the ability to choose camera positions. For downhill skiing, for instance, you might prefer watching from a particular location on the mountain, the way a spectator would, rather than have the camera shift the skier goes down. For figure skating, one camera will be near the judges so you can get their vantage point. There will be no cameras on the rink or on any athletes, however.___IF YOU LACK CABLE OR SATELLITE TVFor the most part, access to an online TV service—one that streams many of the channels you’d get from a cable subscription—will also let you use the NBC apps for streaming and VR.Google’s YouTube TV has the lowest price for all five Olympic TV channels, at $35 a month. Google says the service is available in more than 80 U.S. markets, covering more than 80 percent of households, though the NBC station isn’t available everywhere.In excluded markets, you could check out a rival. What works best will depend on your needs:— DirecTV Now also has a $35-a-month offering. But the Olympic Channel is part of a higher tier, at $60 a month, and DirecTV Now generally won’t let you record programs for viewing later (a DVR feature is still being tested among some subscribers).— Hulu with Live TV is $40 a month for all five channels and DVR. read more