Library launches research data collaborative

first_img Read Full Story The Harvard Library, in collaboration with the Office of the Provost, IQSS Dataverse Network and HUIT, is launching the Research Data Collaborative (RDC) to develop research data management services. The RDC program’s FY14 goals include creation of tiered data management training for researchers and librarians, a University-wide data compliance network, effective data management plan support and an assessment of the data storage and curation needs of Harvard researchers.The RDC program members will provide training materials along with workshops that broadly address research data management. Topics such as data security, storage, archiving, preservation and curation will be covered, in addition to data advisory services regarding retention and compliance policies. A University-wide survey and assessment will lay the groundwork for effective data management support services for a Harvard audience.The program is led by Gosia Stergios and a team of 17.The RDC is actively recruiting team members from the University community.Learn more about the program and its teams by clicking on the story link below.last_img read more

Business School Professor David A. Garvin dies at 64

first_imgDavid A. Garvin, Harvard Business School’s C. Roland Christensen Professor of Business Administration, died at his home in Lexington, Mass., on April 30 after a long battle with cancer. He was 64 years old.An influential and prolific scholar, during a distinguished career that spanned almost four decades Garvin studied business and management processes; the principles of organizational learning; the design and leadership of large, complex organizations; graduate management education; and case method pedagogy. He authored or co-authored 10 books and 37 articles.“David Garvin was an extraordinary teacher and gifted scholar who excelled in reaching a wide audience on a broad range of topics,” said Harvard Business School Dean Nitin Nohria. A member of the HBS faculty since 1979, first in what was then known as the Production and Operations Management Unit (now Technology and Operations Management) and then in General Management beginning in 1994, Garvin taught a variety of courses in the School’s M.B.A. and Executive Education programs. He served as faculty chair of the M.B.A. program’s Elective Curriculum from 2006 to 2009.Promoted from assistant to associate professor in 1984 and then to full professor in 1989, Garvin was named to the Robert and Jane Cizik Professorship in 1991. He became the C. Roland Christensen Professor of Business Administration in 2002.At Harvard Business School, Garvin developed more than 70 case studies, along with multimedia exercises and technical notes. Nearly a dozen of his cases are among the most popular in the School’s case collection, including Paul Levy, Boeing 767, and Emerging Business Opportunities at IBM. Among his many awards was the Richard Beckhard Memorial Prize in 1998 for the best Sloan Management Review article on planned change and organizational development. He also won two Robert F. Greenhill Awards for outstanding service to Harvard Business School.In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the David A. Garvin Wilderness and Environmental Conservation Fund, established by friends and family at Harvard Business School to further its faculty and student involvement in this social responsibility field. Please email [email protected] or contact Kerry Cietanno, Harvard Business School, Teele Hall, Soldiers Field, Boston, MA 02163.To read the full obituary, visit the Business School’s website.last_img read more

Welcome to Brembo’s Digital Factory

first_imgIoT Drives Innovation for the Cars of the FutureEleven years ago, my husband Simon, baby Ellen and I visited Monaco during the Grand Prix. I was immediately struck by the atmosphere and excitement surrounding the event. You could say that trip was the start of my love affair with car racing!Today, I’m still a big fan and am particularly fascinated with Le Mans. It’s not just about the skill and endurance of the drivers over a 24-hour period as they navigate the track at high speed, making critical decisions in literally a fraction of a second. No, I’m even more fascinated by the whole race strategy, selecting the best car, the right brakes and tyres, understanding track grip and studying the weather forecast. For me, car racing is an amazing combination of engineering and science coupled with human skill and judgement.Digital transformation Knowing all this, you can imagine how excited I was when our team recently participated in an IoT digital transformation project with Brembo, a world-leading manufacturer and innovator in brake systems for high performance cars, motorbikes and commercial vehicles. I love the fact that the company is responsible for every part of the product life-cycle, all the way from research and design through to producing the castings in the foundries, manufacture, assembly and test. It’s a real end-to-end process.Monitoring productionTwo years ago, Brembo took the decision to digitally transform its business. The Company’s goal was to develop a heterogeneous environment across all of its factories worldwide and reduce its operational costs. Fast forward to today and our Dell edge gateways and embedded PCs are being used to monitor production lines in all 17 of the Company’s plants across the world.Knowledge is powerWhat has this delivered in terms of business benefits? According to Paolo Crovetti, Brembo’s Chief Information Officer, IoT has helped the Company increase productivity with the team now able to assess the efficiency of each production line in real-time as well as conduct historical analysis. “It’s easier to review quality stats and access data on every single product coming out of the factory every day. We can quickly access information about what materials are being used, what parts take the longest time to produce and what might be causing the production line to fail.”Data-driven decisionsIn the past, the parameters for each line were decided by local production managers and line operators. Now using data mining and machine learning, Brembo can quickly identify what parameters work best in terms of output and quality. Instead of stopping production to conduct routine maintenance, engineers can also monitor the performance of the machinery and are supported in predicting when maintenance needs to take place.Innovation is keyIn Brembo’s world, innovation is key. The team is constantly researching and testing the efficacy of materials such as carbon, carbon ceramic and aluminium. After all, efficient, light-weight brakes can reduce the weight of the car, which is important not only from a safety perspective but also for the environment in terms of reduced emissions. Since 2002, Brembo has been working on mechatronics, a new science that merges mechanics, hydraulics and IT. This innovation is now being road-tested.Safety is keyIn everyday life, we take so many things for granted. We assume that when we hit the brake pedal, the car will automatically slow down. The truth is that your life can literally depend on the car brakes responding. And so, I was fascinated to learn that Brembo considers Le Mans the ideal test bench for technical innovations that will later appear in regular road cars. Read more here.I am proud of the fact that Dell Technologies OEM | Embedded & Edge Solutions is helping to improve efficiency and drive innovation, supporting Brembo in its bid to develop and manufacture the safest and best performing brakes possible.Have you implemented IoT in your factory? What has been your experience of industrial automation? Do join the conversation. Follow us on Twitter  and join our LinkedIn Dell Technologies OEM | Embedded & Edge Solutions Showcase page.I’d love to hear your comments and questions.View our Brembo video case study here, and learn more about out work in industrial automation at Dell Technologies OEM | Embedded & Edge Solutions. If you would like to speak to somebody, please contact us.last_img read more

Herbicide Transfer

first_imgAfter fielding a number of calls and examining plant samples brought in to the Bartow County Extension Office, I have decided vegetable gardeners are probably better off not using hay or manure in their gardens. Twenty years ago, manure was a great soil amendment to add to gardens. It was considered a good source of natural organic nutrients as an alternative to synthetic fertilizers. Today it is nearly impossible to find a manure source that doesn’t contain herbicide residues. Ironically, this defeats the purpose of trying to be an organic gardener. Most gardeners don’t give much thought to where their manure comes from, aside from the obvious source. The vast majority of farmers spray their hayfields and pastures with herbicides for broadleaf weed control. Today’s hay customers expect weed-free sources of hay for their animals and farmers must meet the demand of their customers. Herbicides used today are safe as far as having low toxicity to humans and animals. In fact, many of these herbicides can be sprayed one day and grazed the next by livestock. The problem is that many of these herbicides have long-lasting residual activity. Some commonly used products are known to last as long as 8 to 12 months in the soil. Herbicide residues also remain active on forage hay fed to livestock and grass clippings from lawns that are sprayed. If you spray your lawn for weeds, don’t put your grass clippings in your garden or your compost bin. These herbicides are very good at what they do: killing broadleaf weeds without killing the grass. Unfortunately, these products don’t know the difference between a broadleaf weed and a prized tomato plant. Whether the manure comes from horses, cattle, alpacas, goats or other livestock, there’s a chance the animal could have been exposed to an herbicide. Even if the livestock owner doesn’t spray his pastures, hay that is purchased to feed the animals could have been sprayed. You should assume that any hay that is mostly weed-free has been treated with an herbicide. About the only forage hay that will not have been sprayed is alfalfa, since most broadleaf herbicides cannot be sprayed without damaging the alfalfa, too. If livestock owners only feed alfalfa hay to their animals and don’t spray their pastures, then you could use the manure in your garden. Most livestock owners also feed grass hays such as fescue, bermudagrass and orchard grass that are likely sprayed for weeds. Ask the livestock owner if he sprays his fields and what type of hay he feeds his animals. If you can’t get the answers to these questions, assume the hay has been sprayed with an herbicide and don’t use it in your garden. If you’ve already incorporated manures or hay mulches into your garden, watch your vegetables closely for unusual symptoms. Tomatoes are very susceptible to herbicide damage and are often the first indicator of a problem. If damaged, tomatoes will have extreme leaf curling and twisted stems. Usually, the newest growth on the plant is the first to show these symptoms. If you are unsure, bring a leaf sample to the local University of Georgia Extension office to rule out any other insect or disease problems.last_img read more

Plants in Space

first_imgWhen the public thinks of NASA, the first images that come to mind are often rockets or satellites. In the future, images of greenhouses might also make the list.This spring, University of Georgia undergraduate students Ruqayah Bhuiyan and Niki Padgett will head to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for research internships focusing on ways to grow food in space.Bhuiyan, a horticulture student in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and Padgett, a biology student in the UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, were selected from hundreds of applicants for NASA’s spring internship program.“Our students do all kinds of interesting internships,” said Marc van Iersel, professor of horticulture in CAES and a pioneer in controlled-environment agriculture. “But to have two UGA students selected for a NASA internship is unique and exciting. These are clearly two outstanding students with a passion for science and research. They will represent UGA very well.”A native of Athens, Georgia, Bhuiyan will graduate in 2019. She hopes her work at NASA will strengthen her understanding of controlled-environment agriculture. Whether it’s on the International Space Station or on a more earthbound farm, the future of agriculture is going to be about growing more with fewer resources, she said.”The research that they’re doing at the center is something that I’ve always been interested in,” Bhuiyan said. “They have to use minimal resources — water, media, and lighting because they are restricted to what they have in the Space Station. I’ve always been interested in working in that kind of environment — working to produce food for as many people as possible using limited resources.“This type of research, I’m sure, could be applied to many large-scale farming operations in the future.”Bhuiyan is specifically interested in the mechanics of systems that maximize the production of food in closed environments.Padgett, who is from Buford, Georgia, plans to graduate in 2018. She is interested in studying the symbiotic relationships between plants and microbes and how those relationships can help keep plants healthy in closed environments.“It’s always been my dream to work for NASA as a research scientist. It’s wonderful to step into that dream so soon,” Padgett said. “I’ve worked hard to get to this position … I can not think of a more fascinating, or rewarding, experience than to work on growing life to sustain human life beyond our atmosphere.”For more information about the UGA Department of Horticulture, visit www.caes.uga.edu/departments/horticulture.html. For more information about the UGA Department of Plant Biology, visit www.plantbio.uga.edu/.last_img read more

Thru-Hiking the Cumberland Trail

first_img“Hmm, I haven’t seen a blaze in a while,” I thought to myself as I wrestled with a briar that had wrapped itself around me like a hungry octopus. This turned out to be a recurring theme for most of this sufferfest.Ethan Alexander, trail name Garbelly, and I had the idea to walk the length of the Cumberland Trail in one go. It all seemed simple enough. We’ve hiked over 7,000 miles between the two of us and were no strangers to getting lost, stuck in thunderstorms, thorns, facing shotgun-wielding locals, injuries, body funk, and insatiable appetites.The problem is, the Cumberland Trail really isn’t a single trail at all. Rather, it’s a series of segments that are being worked on diligently by some amazing people in hopes of connecting them to one another. All together, there’s about 200 miles of trail built between Chattanooga and Cumberland Gap at the Tennessee-Kentucky-Virginia borders. Around 125 miles of those trails see enough traffic to justify maintenance, however. But the rest involves a lot of bushwhacking.Two hours into our first day, it started to rain. It was the kind of rain that turns a trail into a creek. The kind of rain where you have to accept that you’re going to be wet. Everywhere. Several day hikers ran past us as we smiled and walked farther into the deluge, because that’s what thru hikers do. We aimed for the puddles.Our second day was the real doozy of the trip. We soon came to realize that if an atlas, topo, and online map say a trail or road is going to be there, it still might not actually be there. While following an old logging road to get to the next trailhead, our path unexpectedly ended.“Map check?” I ask.“Sure.” Garbelly sighs.After triple checking we were in the right spot, we figured the road must have existed at one point and was now just too overgrown to continue north on. So we found the next best thing; a deer path. It was going north (kinda), gave us something to follow, and the map said there was a creek down in the valley that we could then follow to an actual road. From there, we could either hitch or road walk to get to our second section and continue the hike.After 25 miles of jungle-like bushwhacking, we eventually found ourselves stumbling out of someone’s backyard onto a paved road for the first time since what felt like years. We were cut up, soaked in sweat, covered in dirt, and mosquitos had feasted on any exposed skin.“What’s wrong with us?” Garbelly asked about a week into the hike.  We were playing a game of kick the pinecone while we meandered down a sleepy gravel road. “I mean it. Why do we enjoy suffering like this so much? Other people do things that they can just relax at.”He made a good point. Why were we unnecessarily putting all this hardship into our lives when we were supposed to be enjoying ourselves? Were we enjoying ourselves? We weren’t angry about our misery. But we weren’t exactly comfortable.If you can triumph over the exhaustion, heat, stinging nettles, and everything else kind of terrible, then you get to revel in the feeling of knowing that you accepted the challenge of throwing yourself into a situation that was completely uncontrollable, and you came out fine. And you did it while carrying everything you needed to keep being fine on your back. It’s an extremely empowering feeling, one that both Garbelly and I have become addicted to. So we kept walking, one foot in front of the other, all the way to Cumberland Gap.Our Three Favorite Spots Along The Cumberland TrailThe Obed Wild and Scenic RiverThe rock formations and foliage are awe inspiring on this section. There’s roller coaster like trail that’s top notch quality. Everything was great. Everything except jumping into a lukewarm river… Like kind of hot river… Seriously, why is that river not cold?Deep CreekThis creek has amazing boulders and a beautiful bridge. The place is so perfect for a lunch break with all the table top boulders filling in the gorge.Laurel Snow Pocket WildernessSpooky tunnels, stories of ghosts and mountain lions, a beautiful river cutting through, rickety bridges, and great campsites you can have to yourself? Yes, please.LEARN MORE Chris Pickering and Ethan Alexander have started a GoFundMe to raise awareness and funds to donate to the Cumberland Trail Conference. 100% of the funds will go to the trail crews that go out and sweat and dig in dirt for five days a week so we can walk these beautiful paths: GoFundMe.com/ConnectingTheCTlast_img read more

Glorious, Spring-like Weather Ahead

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York While February is traditionally among the coldest times of the year, that doesn’t mean this normally frosty month is immune to extremes.Brace yourselves, Long Islanders: You’re about to confront a significant winter warm-up, with temperatures reaching the 40s and topping off in the mid-50s on Sunday. Put away the snow shovel. Break out the sun block.The upcoming spring-like forecast features sunny skies through President’s Day Weekend and well into next week.This Friday’s outlook calls for sunny skies with a high of 41 before temps take a dive in the evening to the freezing mark.The mercury will shake off the shivers Saturday as mostly sunny skies and temperatures pushing 50 degrees are likely. As the forecast stands, Sunday is expected to be even more glorious: a whopping 55-degree day featuring mostly sunny skies. (Perhaps some golf is in order?)Things are also looking up for President’s Day, which is expected to resemble the weekend’s unseasonably warm forecast.It may not technically be beach weather, but the forecast should bring a wide smile to anyone still reeling from last week’s blizzard, which dumped up to 16 inches of snow on the Island. The first major storm of 2017 was followed up by blustery weather and powerful winds, which temporarily knocked out power to thousands of PSEG Long Island customers.Now we can all talk about the weather with something positive to say. In these politically fraught days, such news is always welcome. Almost like a breath of fresh air.last_img read more

The man in the news

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

‘We are up to plan D or E’: Australian rescuers still have no luck catching crocodile

first_imgWright said the large movement area for the crocodile had been one of their major obstacles. The Palu River is 90 kilometers long and flows through the city of Palu, with almost half of the basin area covered by tropical montane forest.“Enthusiastic locals watching on the side of the river also often hindered rescue efforts,” Wright said, adding that the team was now discussing its next hunting strategies.Wright said he had been following stories of the trapped crocodile for the past 18 months and had been trying his best to speak with Indonesian officials and get over to Palu to help relieve the crocodile.The rescue efforts have been going since Tuesday when Wright joined the rescue team to prepare two traps and some floating drums. One of two traps made was then set in the Palu River with the bait of a live duck inside.Read also: Australian presenter Matt Wright to help Palu crocodile stuck in tire for yearsOn Wednesday, the 4-meter-long trapped crocodile was nowhere to be seen, leaving only a medium-sized crocodile swimming freely around the trap. The bait somehow failed to lure the crocodile.The rescue team then planned to up its strategy with the help of the police. On Thursday, the team members were back at the river, jumped on a boat and tried their luck, only to return empty-handed once again.“We spent all night playing cat and mouse with the big fella in the river. Unfortunately, I think we were more the mouse. The crocodile is very cunning and cautious and it does not like the boat approaching him,” Willow wrote on an Instagram post on Friday.“I think we are up to plan D or E now but today is another day.”Although he has failed several times now, Wright said he was glad to be able to share his knowledge with Indonesian rescuers on how to catch and release a large saltwater crocodile in a skilled and most importantly, humane way.During one rescue attempt, Wright was asked by the rescue team to catch a smaller crocodile from the river as training. He took the opportunity to catch a small crocodile to show the locals what to do when dealing with a wild crocodile.“Environmental conditions in the water out here are very tough, coupled with the fact that this crocodile isn’t hungry because of the large food sources in the river. So, we need to make sure we are as prepared as we can be for this challenge,” Wright said.As of Friday, Wright has two days left of his work permit. (syk)Topics : Wright then used a living duck as bait with a drone, which was later lost. “Started well, finished bad, no more drone,” Wright said in an Instagram story on Friday. “Willow and I are here just waiting for the crocodile. We just lost the drone, which was a little bit of bomber.”Before being offered to the crocodile, the duck bait was hung on the drone, tied with a rope. The plan was for the crocodile to take the bait and pull the drone along as the device transmitted a feed of the animal’s movement and location.But instead of approaching the bait, the crocodile – which had been resting on the sand dune – swam away before disappearing without a trace. Australian presenter Matthew Nicolas Wright and fellow crocodile expert Chris “Willow” Wilson made another attempt at rescuing a crocodile trapped in a motorcycle tire in the Palu River, Central Sulawesi, on Friday.This time, they focused on what used to be called the Yellow Bridge. With the help of a rescue team from the Central Sulawesi Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA Central Sulawesi), the two Australians were able to track the animal twice as it appeared on a sand dune at the river mouth.Read also: Choked Palu crocodile not yet lured into rescuers’ traplast_img read more