Herbicide Transfer

first_imgAfter fielding a number of calls and examining plant samples brought in to the Bartow County Extension Office, I have decided vegetable gardeners are probably better off not using hay or manure in their gardens. Twenty years ago, manure was a great soil amendment to add to gardens. It was considered a good source of natural organic nutrients as an alternative to synthetic fertilizers. Today it is nearly impossible to find a manure source that doesn’t contain herbicide residues. Ironically, this defeats the purpose of trying to be an organic gardener. Most gardeners don’t give much thought to where their manure comes from, aside from the obvious source. The vast majority of farmers spray their hayfields and pastures with herbicides for broadleaf weed control. Today’s hay customers expect weed-free sources of hay for their animals and farmers must meet the demand of their customers. Herbicides used today are safe as far as having low toxicity to humans and animals. In fact, many of these herbicides can be sprayed one day and grazed the next by livestock. The problem is that many of these herbicides have long-lasting residual activity. Some commonly used products are known to last as long as 8 to 12 months in the soil. Herbicide residues also remain active on forage hay fed to livestock and grass clippings from lawns that are sprayed. If you spray your lawn for weeds, don’t put your grass clippings in your garden or your compost bin. These herbicides are very good at what they do: killing broadleaf weeds without killing the grass. Unfortunately, these products don’t know the difference between a broadleaf weed and a prized tomato plant. Whether the manure comes from horses, cattle, alpacas, goats or other livestock, there’s a chance the animal could have been exposed to an herbicide. Even if the livestock owner doesn’t spray his pastures, hay that is purchased to feed the animals could have been sprayed. You should assume that any hay that is mostly weed-free has been treated with an herbicide. About the only forage hay that will not have been sprayed is alfalfa, since most broadleaf herbicides cannot be sprayed without damaging the alfalfa, too. If livestock owners only feed alfalfa hay to their animals and don’t spray their pastures, then you could use the manure in your garden. Most livestock owners also feed grass hays such as fescue, bermudagrass and orchard grass that are likely sprayed for weeds. Ask the livestock owner if he sprays his fields and what type of hay he feeds his animals. If you can’t get the answers to these questions, assume the hay has been sprayed with an herbicide and don’t use it in your garden. If you’ve already incorporated manures or hay mulches into your garden, watch your vegetables closely for unusual symptoms. Tomatoes are very susceptible to herbicide damage and are often the first indicator of a problem. If damaged, tomatoes will have extreme leaf curling and twisted stems. Usually, the newest growth on the plant is the first to show these symptoms. If you are unsure, bring a leaf sample to the local University of Georgia Extension office to rule out any other insect or disease problems.last_img read more

UGA Field Day

first_imgCotton and peanut research will be featured at the University of Georgia field day, set for Wednesday, Sept. 9, on the UGA campus in Tifton, Georgia.The Georgia Peanut Commission, Georgia Cotton Commission and the UGA cotton and peanut teams will host the field day, which begins at 8:30 a.m. at the Lang-Rigdon Farm, located on 230 Rigdon Altman Road, Tifton.The event will showcase current UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences research projects being conducted at different research farms in Tifton. Growers will learn the latest information and be able to ask UGA researchers about production of the two crops. “The cotton and peanut research field day allows UGA (Cooperative) Extension and research faculty to update their commodity funding agencies and agricultural clientele of current research projects in cotton and peanuts,” said Scott Monfort, UGA Extension peanut agronomist. “Projects include breeding, entomology, agronomy and plant pathology for both cotton and peanuts.”At 10:50 a.m., the field day will relocate to the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center for a tour of the Rural Development Center (RDC) pivot farm, located across from the conference center. Lunch will be served at 12:45 p.m. at the conference center while UGA cotton and peanut economists discuss their respective commodities. Registration is free, but required. Contact Debbie Rutland at (229) 386-3424 or drutland@uga.edu by Thursday, Sept. 3.last_img read more

On-the-go Snacks

first_imgWith kids in after-school activities and adults working full-time jobs, ensuring that the family is eating, much less eating right, can be a challenge.Making well-rounded meals or snacks is easier when parents get into the habit of thinking ahead.Preparing snacks ahead of time alleviates stress when trying to keep tiny tummies full and tiny bodies nourished, said Alison Berg, an assistant professor in the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences Department of Foods and Nutrition and UGA Cooperative Extension specialist. Berg suggests that families looking to plan their meals and snacks in advance visit ChooseMyPlate.gov for meal planning ideas and nutrition information.“ChooseMyPlate.gov is fantastic,” Berg said. “It’s backed by years of nutrition science to say, ‘This is what we should be eating,’ and it’s applicable for people ages 2 years and older to see what their eating patterns should be like.”Berg’s go-to snack suggestions include whole grains, whole fruits and vegetables that are easy to transport.Prepared snack foods are also options, but parents need to read those labels carefully.“I see a lot of granola bars being consumed,” Berg said. “They come in a single serving, they typically have nuts and whole grains so kids get protein, carbohydrates and heart-healthy fats. It would be nice to complement that with a fruit that will last in the backpack. Homemade trail mix that has whole-grain cereal, nuts and dried fruit can also be a good choice on the go. Those will sustain your energy levels.”Preparing food to eat prior to a physical activityThe best food choices before a physical activity depend on how far in advance the food is being eaten. If there are 30 minutes before the activity, eat carbohydrates, such as whole fruits or bread. If there is an hour before the activity, eat a carbohydrate and a protein, like half of a sandwich on whole-grain bread or a banana with peanut butter.After the physical activity is complete, choose foods that provide both carbohydrates and protein to help with recovery.“Chocolate milk is a good recovery drink,” said Berg. “It has carbs and proteins. Also, the snack that’s good an hour before (the physical activity) is good after, such as a banana and peanut butter, a peanut butter or turkey sandwich on whole-grain bread, or a yogurt with fruit.”Time crunch at the drive-thruEven on nights when meal and snack plans fall through, it’s not impossible to make nutritious choices, Berg said.Fast-food restaurants are adding healthier options to their drive-thru menus. Berg suggests swapping out some foods for healthier alternatives, such as getting a salad instead of fries, or getting a grilled chicken sandwich instead of a cheeseburger. Oftentimes, the condiments are the culprits with hidden calories.“Sometimes just asking for condiments on the side will save calories,” Berg said. “The burger might be fine, the bun might be fine, but the mayo and toppings can add a lot of calories. Just stick to the basics.”As the school year comes into full swing, devote time during the week to prepare food or plan meals, Berg said. It can save time and lead to healthier decisions.last_img read more

Plants in Space

first_imgWhen the public thinks of NASA, the first images that come to mind are often rockets or satellites. In the future, images of greenhouses might also make the list.This spring, University of Georgia undergraduate students Ruqayah Bhuiyan and Niki Padgett will head to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for research internships focusing on ways to grow food in space.Bhuiyan, a horticulture student in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and Padgett, a biology student in the UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, were selected from hundreds of applicants for NASA’s spring internship program.“Our students do all kinds of interesting internships,” said Marc van Iersel, professor of horticulture in CAES and a pioneer in controlled-environment agriculture. “But to have two UGA students selected for a NASA internship is unique and exciting. These are clearly two outstanding students with a passion for science and research. They will represent UGA very well.”A native of Athens, Georgia, Bhuiyan will graduate in 2019. She hopes her work at NASA will strengthen her understanding of controlled-environment agriculture. Whether it’s on the International Space Station or on a more earthbound farm, the future of agriculture is going to be about growing more with fewer resources, she said.”The research that they’re doing at the center is something that I’ve always been interested in,” Bhuiyan said. “They have to use minimal resources — water, media, and lighting because they are restricted to what they have in the Space Station. I’ve always been interested in working in that kind of environment — working to produce food for as many people as possible using limited resources.“This type of research, I’m sure, could be applied to many large-scale farming operations in the future.”Bhuiyan is specifically interested in the mechanics of systems that maximize the production of food in closed environments.Padgett, who is from Buford, Georgia, plans to graduate in 2018. She is interested in studying the symbiotic relationships between plants and microbes and how those relationships can help keep plants healthy in closed environments.“It’s always been my dream to work for NASA as a research scientist. It’s wonderful to step into that dream so soon,” Padgett said. “I’ve worked hard to get to this position … I can not think of a more fascinating, or rewarding, experience than to work on growing life to sustain human life beyond our atmosphere.”For more information about the UGA Department of Horticulture, visit www.caes.uga.edu/departments/horticulture.html. For more information about the UGA Department of Plant Biology, visit www.plantbio.uga.edu/.last_img read more

Seed-to-Plate

first_imgIn just under two decades, the local food movement has changed the way many people think about their food. Now it’s time for the next step: a local seed system.The wall between heirloom seed varieties and mass produced modern varieties needs to be dismantled, chef Daniel Barber told the more than 300 people gathered at the University of Georgia Special Collections Library on Tuesday. Plant breeders, like those at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, need to work more closely with farmers and chefs to produce varieties that provide natural disease and pest resistance as well as phenomenal flavor.“You can take advantage of the past with respect and modernity and turn it into something very exciting for the future,” he said during his talk, titled “What Kind of Menu will Meet the Challenges of the Future? Exploring a New Recipe for Good Food from the Ground Up.”Barber, who has pioneered the farm-to-table movement in fine dining in New York City and upstate New York, has received multiple James Beard Foundation awards and built a reputation as a chef and farmer. He is also the author of “The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food” and has been featured in documentaries “Chef’s Table” and “Wasted! The Story of Food Waste.”To blend the flavor of heirlooms and the hardiness of modern varieties, local chefs and farmers will have to work with plant breeders to develop vegetables and fruits adapted to each region. Scientists at land-grant universities are uniquely positioned to help make this happen.Earlier this year, inspired by his search for new flavors and more hardy heirloom vegetable varieties, Barber’s team launched Row 7 Seed Company — a cooperative of chefs and plant breeders working to provide flavor-focused vegetable varieties that retain some natural disease and pest resistance.Generally, plant varieties and seeds are developed to thrive in the most wide-ranging environmental conditions possible, often to the detriment of flavor. This is because seed companies need to sell their seeds in as many towns and states as possible to maximize profit.“This company wants to do the exact opposite,” Barber told the crowd. “The idea is to look at the development of a seed and flavor from a microscopic level. What is this particular region — the ecological conditions, the cultural conditions — dictating for a seed?”Farmers and plant breeders have traditionally worked hand in hand to develop varieties that will thrive in local conditions through the land-grant system, but Barber advocates involving chefs in the process as well. He has helped to develop more than a half dozen wheat and grain varieties based on the flavor profiles he wants to cook with.“Why shouldn’t a chef be at the table with the initial construction of a seed?” he asked. “That comes with a little bit of hubris, but I’ve found that’s its actually possible.”Barber was at UGA to speak to students and the public about his vision for the modern food and farm systems, but he also wanted to visit with plant breeders in the college. He met with CAES breeders, toured UGA’s student-run farm UGArden and visited local organic farm Woodland Gardens in Winterville, Georgia.He hopes to work with UGA plant breeders to develop new varieties that provide trademark flavors for Southeastern farmers and chefs.“We’re going to start the breeding projects moving forward on this very local, very micro level,” he told the crowd. “I’ve been more emboldened in this idea while I’ve been here in Georgia, just in the last few hours, seeing the interest, enthusiasm and passion for a new food culture and by the youth and how they’re dialed into good food, good flavor, fresh ingredients, and exploring and celebrating this very diverse environment and history that y’all have here.”For more information about the ways in which UGA CAES supports local food systems in Georgia, visit caes.uga.edu. For those who weren’t able to attend Barber’s lecture, the video recording will soon be available.last_img read more

PilatesSpace opens a Studio in Burlington, Vermont

first_imgPilatesSpace opens a Studio in Burlington, VermontNew Studio Features Vermonts First Access to the Gyrotonic® Expansion SystemBurlington PilatesSpace, a fitness and physical therapy studio, announces today the opening of its new space at 208 Flynn Avenue in Burlington. PilatesSpace offers private, semi-private and group sessions in Pilates. Pilates, a conditioning program developed by Joseph Pilates in the 1920s, uses specialized equipment and mat exercises to improve strength, flexibility, breathing function, posture and coordination. PilatesSpace also offers Gyrotonic®, yoga, massage, and physical therapy.The 2000 square foot studio in the 208 building on Flynn Avenue, includes mat space and 15 pieces of Pilates equipment, the largest most well-equipped studio in Vermont. PilatesSpace also features the Gyrotonic® Expansion System, which has been featured in USA Today and Time Magazine. These exercises are popular among dancers and athletes. It has also been used in Germany to help elderly patients with osteoporosis and spinal injuries. PilatesSpace is the first studio in Vermont to offer sessions with this specialized equipment. PilatesSpace also shares space with Every Woman Physical Therapy, which provides physical therapy services exclusively for women including pool therapy in the 120 square foot indoor heated aquatic therapy pool.Owner Pamela Stone, MSPT, says, The new space allows us to expand and be more convenient to Burlington residents. Our goal is for clients to have a personalized workout in a safe environment with full awareness in the moment. This bright and beautiful new space will allow us to give clients that kind of experience.Pamela Stone is a physical therapist certified in the Gyrotonic Expansion System® and the Polestar Pilates Rehabilitation Curriculum. Her interest in functional movement and bodies in balance developed during her 20 years as a dancer and led her to pursue a Master of Science in Physical Therapy from Regis University in Denver, Colorado. Since 1998, Pamela has practiced Physical Therapy, Pilates and Gyrotonic®. Pamela directed Pilates Vermont at the Shelburne Athletic Club for two years before starting PilatesSpace.For more information, visit www.pilatesspace.net(link is external) or call 802.863.9900.last_img read more

State, business leaders advocate for changes in unemployment insurance

first_imgLegislators, including Rep. Mike Marcotte, Vice Chair of the House Commerce Committee, Department of Labor Commissioner Patricia Moulton Powden, business owners, and leaders of the state s business organizations held a press conference today regarding fiscal challenges facing the Unemployment Insurance (UI) trust fund. They are urging legislative leaders to take action to address the growing shortfall in the trust fund through a balanced approach of gradual increases in the taxable wage base and adjustments in Vermont s unemployment benefits.last_img

EatingWell Media wins three James Beard awards

first_imgAbout EatingWell: EatingWell Media Group (EWMG) is a fast-growing, independently owned media company and a leading source of science-based nutrition advice, delicious, easy and healthy recipes and useful shopping information. The company has rapidly diversified from producing its flagship bimonthly EatingWell Magazine (which now reaches more than 1.8 million readers) to multiple formats, including a content-rich website (www.eatingwell.com(link is external)) that reaches 2 million unique visitors a month, consumer cookbooks and health books, content and brand licensing, digital and custom publishing. EatingWell,EatingWell Media Group, publisher of EatingWell Magazine, EatingWell books and EatingWell.com, won an unprecedented three James Beard Awards on Friday, May 6, in New York City.It was the only magazine publisher to win three awards, dubbed the ‘Oscars’ in food journalism, from the James Beard Foundation. EatingWell, based in Charlotte, Vermont, earned two journalism awards and one book award. Three books from Ten Speed Press won and New York Magazine won two awards, one for an article and one for its Grub Street blog.The Simple Art of EatingWell (Countryman Press) by Jessie Price and the Editors of EatingWell took the Cookbook with Healthy Focus award. The 520-page compendium of tips, techniques and recipes for healthy eating was up against finalists The Very Best Recipes for Health from The New York Times’s Martha Rose Shulman and Clean Start: Inspiring You to Eat Clean and Live Well by Terry Walters.In addition to EatingWell’s award, Vermonter Barry Estabrook won a medal for an individual food blog for politicsoftheplate.com.The journalism awards were open to entries from all media. For the second year in a row, EatingWell Magazine won the category Health and Nutrition. The 2011 award went to Rachael Moeller Gorman for her article ‘Captain of the Happier Meal’ (June 2010), a profile of scientist Joe Hibbeln and his research linking omega-3s with depression. The two other finalists were Peter Jaret’s Runner’s World story ‘Pasta Perfect’ and Joe Fassler’s multipart TheAtlantic.com coverage of the egg contamination scare.‘Sea Change’ (April 2010), marine biologist Carl Safina’s eye-opening article about the benefits of eating smaller fish, won in the Environment, Food Politics, and Policy category. Runners-up included Barry Estabrook’s Gastronomica article ‘A Tale of Two Dairies’ and Monica Eng’s Chicago Tribune piece ‘CPS Won’t Let Kids Eat Their Vegetables.’‘Each of these wins represents one of the core values we stand for: good food, good health and sustainability,’ said Editorial Director Lisa Gosselin. ‘We’re especially proud that our small team of editors from an independent Vermont-based media group is being recognized for producing the top food and health content in the country.’last_img read more

Study predicts 1 TW of solar capacity by 2023

first_imgStudy predicts 1 TW of solar capacity by 2023 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:It’s time for our regular check-in on where solar PV installations are headed. Here’s the quick answer: Prices are still going down and capacity is going up around the world. Pretty much the same path we’ve been on.But that path for solar has widened.In fact, within the next five years, the world will likely have over 1 terawatt of solar capacity installed, according to the latest global data from Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables. That’s a trillion watts. That’s enough to serve more than one-third of America’s electricity consumption.Our last major capacity projection was one year ago, when the GTM Research team forecasted 871 gigawatts by 2022. The latest projections show higher-than-expected growth for every year after 2018. For example, WoodMac projections for 2020 are 26 gigawatts higher than last year’s forecast.Basically, it’s Asia and everyone else. China, Japan and India will make up 20 percent of the total global market through 2023. Over the next two years, China and Japan will make up half of annual installations—even with both markets in decline this year.The reason for the upward adjustment in capacity is pretty simple. Prices are ultra-competitive—and falling. More countries are putting in place auction systems — increasingly “subsidy-free”— and large-scale solar PV is winning a lot of bids. Cost drops haven’t kept pace with recent price drops, but WoodMac expects costs to catch up. WoodMac analysts simulated 625 auction-tariff scenarios and found a median price of 2 cents per kilowatt-hour by 2022.More: By 2023, the world will have 1 trillion watts of installed solar PV capacity–last_img read more

Analyst says rising domestic production will cut China’s need for thermal coal imports in 2019

first_imgAnalyst says rising domestic production will cut China’s need for thermal coal imports in 2019 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享South China Morning Post:China’s thermal coal imports will decline by between 10 million and 12 million tonnes in 2019, a leading industry analyst said on Tuesday, largely because of rising domestic output in the world’s top producer and consumer.The country’s coal output will increase from the second quarter of 2019, reducing its reliance on overseas supplies, Rodrigo Echeverri, head of hard commodities at trader Noble Group, told an industry conference in Shanghai.China is set to produce an additional 100 million tonnes of coal this year, Wang Hongqiao, vice-president of China National Coal Association, said earlier at the same event. “Coal demand for power generation in China will increase but the growth rate of general coal consumption will slow down,” Wang said, leading to a glut of the fuel and “severely disrupting” the market.China produced 4 billion tonnes of coal in 2018, according to the National Bureau of Statistics. It also added 194 million tonnes in mine capacity that year, despite promising to cut excess capacity for the sector.Echeverri said he expected a drop in thermal coal imports this year of 11 per cent from 2018 volumes to 19 million tonnes, with the reduction hitting top supplier Australia the hardest.That comes after traders have already cut back on purchases of both thermal and metallurgical coal from Australia due to lengthy quality checks on supplies from there that have lasted as long as two months at some ports.More: China’s thermal coal imports ‘will fall 10-12 million tonnes in 2019’last_img read more