Best Buddies hosts fashion show

first_imgThe Notre Dame Best Buddies club, a club serving people with intellectual disabilities, will host a fashion show as part of Disabilities Awareness Month on Wednesday in Legends.“The event is meant to gain awareness for disabilities, but is also just a fun night,” President of Best Buddies and senior Kelly Keenan said. “Our buddies are people in South Bend who have intellectual and developmental disabilities, and the event will be a chance for them to get dressed up and have fun.”The fashion show is part of a yearly initiative formed several yearsw ago on campus by Notre Dame graduate Soeren Palumbo to end the use of the R-word.  This year, Best Buddies is collaborating with Special Olympics and the Super Sibs club to hold the event, Keenan said.“The [fashion] show was a vision of another member of Best Buddies,” she said. “She had a friend on campus that is a Vineyard Vines representative, so they are supplying our men’s clothing. A boutique in Granger, Ind., called Sorella is supplying the women’s clothing, and we also have clothing from adidas and Dress Barn.”Keenan said planning the show has been an organizational process.“When we knew we wanted to hold a fashion show, we spoke to Legends because they had done fashion shows before, so they already had the whole event set up for us,” Keenan said. “There has also been a lot of communication to find clothing to borrow.”Keenan said she hopes the event will open the eyes of the Notre Dame community to disabilities.“The main thing we would love is to get a lot of people there and show them what disabilities awareness is really about,” Keenan said. “We want to show the Notre Dame community what this is all about and what our three clubs do.”In addition to the fashion show, members of the Best Buddies club will be in the LaFortune Student Center, North and South dining halls and the Hesburgh Library on Wednesday as part of a pledge campaign.“We will station ourselves around campus to gather pledges to end the hateful use of the R-word,” Keenan said.Keenan said an important component of the event is to make sure everyone has a good time.“Our buddies are so excited about walking the runway in awesome clothes,” Keenan said. “We want to make it a fun event for everyone involved.”Contact Katie McCarty at   kmccart6@nd.eduTags: best buddies, disabilities awareness, fashion show, NDlast_img read more

USC poll shows shift in women and older adult voters

first_imgFifty-one percent of voters over 65 showed more support for Democratic candidates compared to 45 percent of older voters supporting Republican candidates. (Photo courtesy of USC Dornsife)Democratic candidates are gaining support from women and older American likely voters, making them more likely to win the U.S. House majority, according to a recent national poll by the Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences and the Los Angeles Times. The latest poll conducted from Aug. 22 to Sept. 24 showed that 51 percent of likely voters would support a Democratic candidate if the elections were held today compared to 41 percent for a Republican candidate. The poll surveyed slightly over 5,000 U.S. residents, including over 4,100 registered voters and over 2,500 likely midterm voters. It also showed that 57 percent of likely voters disapprove of President Donald Trump and 45 percent saw their vote in the upcoming election as a “statement of opposition” to Trump. Michael Murphy, co-director for USC Dornsife’s Center for the Political Future, told USC News that voters’ dislike for Trump is hurting Republicans’ chances of winning House seats.“We now know from the data that President Trump is a drag on the midterm,” Murphy told USC News. “He has all of the problems of a president facing his first midterm. He is still trying to grab the primary rather than capitalizing on these other issues, like the economy.” Half of female voters saw their vote as an opposition to Trump, according to the poll. Compared with a previous poll from July and August, suburban women’s support of Democratic candidates grew nine points, giving Democrats a 61 percentage point advantage among likely female voters. “In the past, Republicans and Democrats alike have wooed suburban women through their identities as mothers, and this specific shift away from the Republican Party comes after the controversial images of immigrant children in detention hit the news,” gender studies and political science professor Hancock Alfaro told USC News. “Through their support of this policy, Republican candidates also became complicit in a policy of family separation.”Likely voters ages 65 and older also showed more support for Democratic candidates, with 51 percent supporting Democrats compared to 45 percent of older likely voters supporting Republicans. Half of these respondents said that health care is a key issue that can swing their vote if a candidate doesn’t support their views.Forty percent of likely voters supported building Trump’s border wall, while three out of four likely voters said they support a path to citizenship for immigrant children whose parents illegally brought them to live in the U.S.“The vast majority [of Republican voters] said [immigration] is one of the most serious problems facing the country today,” Jill Darling, survey director for the USC Dornsife Center for Economic and Social Research told USC News. “However, we are not seeing any evidence that it is driving the ‘red wave’ that President Trump has predicted.”last_img read more