EatingWell Media wins three James Beard awards

first_imgAbout EatingWell: EatingWell Media Group (EWMG) is a fast-growing, independently owned media company and a leading source of science-based nutrition advice, delicious, easy and healthy recipes and useful shopping information. The company has rapidly diversified from producing its flagship bimonthly EatingWell Magazine (which now reaches more than 1.8 million readers) to multiple formats, including a content-rich website (www.eatingwell.com(link is external)) that reaches 2 million unique visitors a month, consumer cookbooks and health books, content and brand licensing, digital and custom publishing. EatingWell,EatingWell Media Group, publisher of EatingWell Magazine, EatingWell books and EatingWell.com, won an unprecedented three James Beard Awards on Friday, May 6, in New York City.It was the only magazine publisher to win three awards, dubbed the ‘Oscars’ in food journalism, from the James Beard Foundation. EatingWell, based in Charlotte, Vermont, earned two journalism awards and one book award. Three books from Ten Speed Press won and New York Magazine won two awards, one for an article and one for its Grub Street blog.The Simple Art of EatingWell (Countryman Press) by Jessie Price and the Editors of EatingWell took the Cookbook with Healthy Focus award. The 520-page compendium of tips, techniques and recipes for healthy eating was up against finalists The Very Best Recipes for Health from The New York Times’s Martha Rose Shulman and Clean Start: Inspiring You to Eat Clean and Live Well by Terry Walters.In addition to EatingWell’s award, Vermonter Barry Estabrook won a medal for an individual food blog for politicsoftheplate.com.The journalism awards were open to entries from all media. For the second year in a row, EatingWell Magazine won the category Health and Nutrition. The 2011 award went to Rachael Moeller Gorman for her article ‘Captain of the Happier Meal’ (June 2010), a profile of scientist Joe Hibbeln and his research linking omega-3s with depression. The two other finalists were Peter Jaret’s Runner’s World story ‘Pasta Perfect’ and Joe Fassler’s multipart TheAtlantic.com coverage of the egg contamination scare.‘Sea Change’ (April 2010), marine biologist Carl Safina’s eye-opening article about the benefits of eating smaller fish, won in the Environment, Food Politics, and Policy category. Runners-up included Barry Estabrook’s Gastronomica article ‘A Tale of Two Dairies’ and Monica Eng’s Chicago Tribune piece ‘CPS Won’t Let Kids Eat Their Vegetables.’‘Each of these wins represents one of the core values we stand for: good food, good health and sustainability,’ said Editorial Director Lisa Gosselin. ‘We’re especially proud that our small team of editors from an independent Vermont-based media group is being recognized for producing the top food and health content in the country.’last_img read more

Beat writers predict Miami to hand Syracuse its 2nd conference loss

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ After falling to Pittsburgh, 72-61, Syracuse (10-4, 0-1 Atlantic Coast) will get its second shot at its first conference win of the season against No. 13 Miami (11-1). If SU loses, it will be the first time since the ’98-99 season that the Orange has started 0-2 in conference play.Here’s how our beat writers predict Syracuse’s matchup with Miami will unfold on Saturday.Sam Blum (10-4)Miami 74, Syracuse 68Life’s a beachMike Hopkins is coming dangerously close to laying an egg in his brief first stint as Syracuse’s head coach. Without any significant wins, a loss to Miami does just that, and unfortunately for the longtime assistant, the Orange doesn’t match up with one of the best teams in the country. The Hurricanes have only one loss this season — to Northeastern — but have won by at least 10 in all but one other game. Syracuse keeps it close, again, but loses.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textJesse Dougherty (10-4)Miami 78, Syracuse 68Welcome to 2016Syracuse competed for 35 minutes before the wheels fell of against Pittsburgh, but Miami will put away the Orange well before the last five minutes. SU showed on Wednesday that it can compete with a more physical ACC team, but the Hurricanes’ four-out offense with talented guards surrounding Tonye Jekiri will be too much for the zone to handle.Matt Schneidman (9-5)Miami 73, Syracuse 61Hurricane seasonAt a practice earlier this season, Mike Hopkins stood at the foul line with the ball in his hands, demonstrating how big men can beat the zone by finding a seam atop it. The first name that came out of his mouth was Tonye Jekiri, Miami’s big man who is one of the best in the ACC. He, and the offensive powerhouse Hurricanes, will be too much for the shallow Orange to handle in its second consecutive conference loss. Comments Published on January 1, 2016 at 7:31 pmlast_img read more