GE’s PCB dumping was legal at the time

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion The Dec. 16 editorial concerning GE cleanup of the Hudson, neglects the fact that they put this stuff in the river while under full compliance of the law at the time.No wonder manufacturing jobs in New York are disappearing.Bruce DuxburyBallston SpaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsGuilderland girls’ soccer team hands BH-BL first league losslast_img

Trump’s latest stunt may be about to blow up in his face

first_imgBut the performance of congressional Republicans on the Sunday shows — and a weekend’s worth of legal analysis taking apart the Nunes effort — together suggest another possibility.The Nunes memo affair may be shaping up as a much bigger fiasco than we even know – so bad, in fact, that it could ultimately undermine Trump’s position even more dramatically than we could have expected.A key conclusion about the Nunes memo reached by legal analysts is that the memo actually confirmed that the FBI’s investigation was launched in July 2016.That’s well in advance of the awarding in October 2016 of a warrant to conduct surveillance on former Trump adviser Carter Page due to his suspected links to Russia, based to an indeterminate extent on Democratic-funded research in the “Steele dossier.”The Nunes memo vaguely notes that information gathered on Trump adviser George Papadopoulos is what triggered the FBI inquiry.Papadopoulos revealed in his plea that he had learned of “dirt” collected on Hillary Clinton by the Russians.What’s more, the Nunes memo notes that surveillance warrants were subsequently granted numerous times. As Paul Rosenzweig, a former Whitewater investigator, points out, these could only have been granted if new evidence had demonstrated sufficient grounds for suspicion of Page, meaning “independent reviews” by “separate judges” actually “validated the FBI’s investigation.”If a rebuttal memo from Rep. Adam Schiff is released by the House Intelligence Committee, it is likely to add detail, where possible, filling in this picture of the genesis of the probe.The New York Times reports that the rebuttal will supply “crucial context” to the FBI’s case for getting the warrant.Indeed, Rep. Jim Himes, Conn., the No. 2 Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, hinted at this when he told CNN that the Democratic rebuttal will show that “it is not true” that the warrant “was awarded solely on the basis of the Steele dossier.”In other words, the Schiff memo will likely detail, to the degree that it can, the actual reasons the warrant was granted — and why subsequent warrants were as well.Yes, Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee could still vote against releasing the Schiff rebuttal.Trump himself signaled opposition to its release, when he tweeted: Categories: Editorial, OpinionIt is still very possible that President Donald Trump could use the Nunes memo as a pretext to try to quash or constrain special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s probe.Trump tweeted over the weekend that the memo “totally vindicates” his claim that the investigation is a “witch hunt,” which is an absurd lie in every possible respect, but it shows he’s still mulling a move on Mueller. Perhaps their bad faith is bottomless enough to permit them to go here, but the glaring thinness of the Nunes memo may make it politically more risky.In the end, Trump could still use the Nunes memo to hamstring Mueller by firing Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and replacing him with a loyalist to oversee the probe.But this would now have to happen either after the Schiff rebuttal served to reinforce the investigation’s legitimacy, or after Trump suppressed the Schiff rebuttal even though it could further undermine his own rationale for taking such a dramatic step.Trump is shameless enough to do this in either scenario. But it could now be harder for congressional Republicans to go along with it.This would not be the case if not for Nunes’s antics — which Trump backed.Greg Sargent writes The Plum Line blog for The Washington Post, offering commentary from a liberal perspective.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen? But on the Sunday shows, multiple Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee firmly stated that the Nunes memo should not be used to cast doubt on the integrity of the Mueller probe.This is disingenuous, in that they voted to release the Nunes memo while knowing Trump wants to use it to target Mueller.Still, this signals that some leading congressional Republicans are now reluctant to be associated with Trump’s efforts to undermine his probe.Trump just raised the stakes, in effect directly associating his seeming opposition to releasing the rebuttal with his own efforts to obstruct the investigation.Yes, Trump himself could block the release of the Schiff rebuttal.But the White House itself called for release of the Nunes memo on grounds of “transparency,” and House Speaker Paul Ryan has come out for releasing Schiff’s rebuttal.If Republicans now give cover to Trump thwarting its release, they will be even more overtly associated with his efforts to block the truth from coming out than before.last_img read more

Fuel’s gold

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The man in the news

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Brief counters

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Bernerd’s sure thing

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Talk of the towns

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‘We are up to plan D or E’: Australian rescuers still have no luck catching crocodile

first_imgWright said the large movement area for the crocodile had been one of their major obstacles. The Palu River is 90 kilometers long and flows through the city of Palu, with almost half of the basin area covered by tropical montane forest.“Enthusiastic locals watching on the side of the river also often hindered rescue efforts,” Wright said, adding that the team was now discussing its next hunting strategies.Wright said he had been following stories of the trapped crocodile for the past 18 months and had been trying his best to speak with Indonesian officials and get over to Palu to help relieve the crocodile.The rescue efforts have been going since Tuesday when Wright joined the rescue team to prepare two traps and some floating drums. One of two traps made was then set in the Palu River with the bait of a live duck inside.Read also: Australian presenter Matt Wright to help Palu crocodile stuck in tire for yearsOn Wednesday, the 4-meter-long trapped crocodile was nowhere to be seen, leaving only a medium-sized crocodile swimming freely around the trap. The bait somehow failed to lure the crocodile.The rescue team then planned to up its strategy with the help of the police. On Thursday, the team members were back at the river, jumped on a boat and tried their luck, only to return empty-handed once again.“We spent all night playing cat and mouse with the big fella in the river. Unfortunately, I think we were more the mouse. The crocodile is very cunning and cautious and it does not like the boat approaching him,” Willow wrote on an Instagram post on Friday.“I think we are up to plan D or E now but today is another day.”Although he has failed several times now, Wright said he was glad to be able to share his knowledge with Indonesian rescuers on how to catch and release a large saltwater crocodile in a skilled and most importantly, humane way.During one rescue attempt, Wright was asked by the rescue team to catch a smaller crocodile from the river as training. He took the opportunity to catch a small crocodile to show the locals what to do when dealing with a wild crocodile.“Environmental conditions in the water out here are very tough, coupled with the fact that this crocodile isn’t hungry because of the large food sources in the river. So, we need to make sure we are as prepared as we can be for this challenge,” Wright said.As of Friday, Wright has two days left of his work permit. (syk)Topics : Wright then used a living duck as bait with a drone, which was later lost. “Started well, finished bad, no more drone,” Wright said in an Instagram story on Friday. “Willow and I are here just waiting for the crocodile. We just lost the drone, which was a little bit of bomber.”Before being offered to the crocodile, the duck bait was hung on the drone, tied with a rope. The plan was for the crocodile to take the bait and pull the drone along as the device transmitted a feed of the animal’s movement and location.But instead of approaching the bait, the crocodile – which had been resting on the sand dune – swam away before disappearing without a trace. Australian presenter Matthew Nicolas Wright and fellow crocodile expert Chris “Willow” Wilson made another attempt at rescuing a crocodile trapped in a motorcycle tire in the Palu River, Central Sulawesi, on Friday.This time, they focused on what used to be called the Yellow Bridge. With the help of a rescue team from the Central Sulawesi Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA Central Sulawesi), the two Australians were able to track the animal twice as it appeared on a sand dune at the river mouth.Read also: Choked Palu crocodile not yet lured into rescuers’ traplast_img read more

Spain reports first coronavirus death in Valencia

first_imgA man in the Spanish region of Valencia has died from coronavirus, marking the country’s first death from the outbreak, a local health official said on Tuesday.Tests carried out post-mortem showed the man, who died on Feb. 13, was killed by the virus, regional health chief Ana Barcelo told a press conference.News of the death came shortly after Spain’s Health Ministry announced on its Twitter page that several sporting events would be held behind closed doors, while medical conferences will be cancelled in an effort to limit the spread of the virus. The ministry said sport fixtures expected to draw crowds from zones designated as high-risk for coronavirus, such as northern Italy, would be played without spectators, having earlier referred to the measure as a recommendation.Such events include the return leg of the Champions League match between Valencia and Italy’s Atalanta scheduled for March 10, and a Europa League match between Getafe and Inter Milan on March 19. Several basketball games will also be affected.In total, around 150 people have been diagnosed with coronavirus in Spain, while some 100 health workers in the Basque region have been isolated in their homes after coming into contact with people carrying the virus.Authorities are monitoring two clusters of the infection in Torrejon de Ardoz, a suburban city close to Madrid with a population of around 130,000, and one in the Basque city of Vitoria-Gasteiz. Topics :last_img read more

India’s Modi to go into virus lockdown for Holi festival

first_imgIndian Prime Minister Narendra Modi said Wednesday he will stay away from celebrations during one of the country’s biggest festivals as coronavirus fears gripped the country of 1.3 billion people.India has been one of the latest countries to report a surge in cases, sparking a run on masks, while the government said all air passengers entering the country would now be screened for the virus that has killed more than 3,000 around the globe.Modi said he would stay away from events for Holi, the “festival of colours”, which is normally a raucous day when paint and water are splashed in the streets of many cities. “Experts across the world have advised to reduce mass gatherings to avoid the spread of COVID-19 Novel Coronavirus,” Modi said on Twitter.”Hence, this year I have decided not to participate in any Holi Milan programme.”The Hindu festival, which this year falls next Tuesday, marks the beginning of spring.Ever since he became prime minister in 2014, Modi has taken part in high-profile events for Holi and other major festivals, mingling freely with crowds. India has reported 28 cases of the new coronavirus so far, up from five on Tuesday, with 16 of them Italian tourists who have been quarantined in New Delhi.India is the world’s second-most populous country after China, where the virus first emerged last year.Worldwide, around 3,200 people have died from the virus with more than 90,000 infections.With the new cases, India has stepped up preventive measures.Health Minister Harsh Vadhan said all air passengers entering the country would now be screened for symptoms.India has already barred visitors from Italy, Iran, South Korea and Japan, except diplomats and officials from international bodies.Authorities say isolation wards are being set up in 25 Delhi hospitals in expectation of a flood of cases.Topics :last_img read more